I was first introduced to Jhené Aiko on Kendrick Lamar's "Growing Apart." Her voice is gentle and somewhat tinged with a sultriness that often encroaches on cutting aggression. Aiko understands where to emphasize her voice, wrapping it around the lyrics to achieve a hypnotic mix of hip hop and R&B. Souled Out, the debut from the singer is made up of mid-temp melodies that emerge as freestyles, rather than songs. This is not a bad thing because Aiko has stated that her process of recording music is one of letting it unfold rather than rushing.

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Originality is such a hard thing to come by these days that it’s no wonder you’ll see so many movies, TV shows and music that look and sound the same.
 When is the last time you heard a song or movie that you couldn’t compare to something else prior? Probably never. That doesn’t mean that originality or creativity has died, but just means that people have a brand new way of seeing things. One of the greatest movies of all times, Star Wars is often compared to Star Trek. They have forums of geeks and nerds sighting the familiarities between these two, I’ll save you the time and say that I’ve seen all the Star Wars series and none of the Star Trek franchise despite their many TV shows and spin-off movies but I'm aware of how they tend to overlap each other in some aspects.


Blacc Hollywood is the fifth studio album from Wiz Khalifa - the rapper known for creating chill songs about getting high and living the high life. Being more of a fan of his mixtapes because he seems to offer more impactful, heavy-hitting rhymes on those, listening to Blacc Hollywood solidified my opinion even further.


Being born in the 90’s certainly touched the new up and coming triple-threat artist Jo’zzy aka @dopebyaccident in a special way. She’s the protégé’ of super producer Timbaland and a talented singer/songwriter/rapper. Not only is the 90’s an inspiration and influence, but a way of life for this 24 year old; whose real name is Jocelyn Donald. She says of new single “Tryna Wife”, “It’s just nostalgic music and only the beginning. Some of today’s R&B and Hip-Hop can be so watered down and cookie-cutter, but my style of music makes you think of the 90’s.”


"They only get to see a certain part of your life and it’s not even fifty percent. It may be about fifteen percent of your life that these people are getting to watch so that’s never a good thing because you become this fifteen percent of what people get to see and there’s way more to most of us that are on that show..."  ~Bambi


“One thing I feel that happens a lot on the urban side of music, not as much on the mainstream pop side of music is that if artists don't come out for a few years, we forget that we loved them. This was not just some song I liked, but this was my favorite group in the world. I feel like the urban audience, we don't hold our stars up like the pop audience do. Their stars will put out an album tomorrow and it will still be double, triple, quadruple platinum…”  
~Brandon Casey of Jagged Edge 


 
 

 

 

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You could listen to his music, say its different, and mean it. You wont have any apprehensions about that assessment. It’s something about how he marries singing to rapping in a way that makes you think the two were made for each other. The fact that he is from Texas, (Hearne and Calvert to be exact) makes the southern twinge on his eloquent voice that much more out of the “box” the game seems to have itself in today. “I Look Good,” a single off of his I’m Here mixtape has swung his name from streets of Texas to now around the world, preparing all of us for something truly unique. Chalie Boy, 30, isn’t just a rapper, or a singer, but he is definitely a star on the rise. Take a look through Parle's telescope...

Parlé: I know you repping Texas, what part are you from?
Chalie Boy: Hearne and Calvert, Texas. Its in the center of Texas, 3 hrs. From Houston, 3 from San Antonio, and 2 from Austin.

Parlé: What was your upbringing like?
Chalie Boy: Regular normal upbringing. I grew up in a rural area. I'm not from the city, but I grew up listening to all types of music and sang in a choir. My moms, helped me from the beginning, and told me a lot of things. She told me to stick to myself and be humble. She taught me about having understanding. With some of those lessons I learned in the industry everything isn't always what its seems.

Parlé: Did you always want to be in music, or did you have other aspirations?
Chalie Boy: I was too short to play ball, 5'5". I was into football, always had the ideas of what I wanted to do in life. I thought I'd have a chance to do something in music, it was a dream but it wasn't a hundred percent. I knew I could sing, but didn't force it.

Parlé: Who were some of your influences?
Chalie Boy: B.B. King, Bun B, T.I., Busta, Gerald Levert, Bebe and Cece Winans. My inspiration comes from all types of music, they like that churchy sound. That's why people say its so soulful when they hear my music. I could rap about being fly, gangsta, living good, living it up. In the music of entertainment, I speak on what I see and it comes out how I feel it.

Parlé: How did your parents take it when you told them you were doing music?
Chalie Boy: They were all for it. My moms didn't understand being a rapper, but she gave me the positive and negatives for it. My father just told me to be the best at whatever.

Parlé: So how did you get into recording music?
Chalie Boy: You know how people might be joking with their friends at high school, doing lame freestylin' in the house. I seriously tried to put the music down when I met DJ Bull, CEO of Dirty 3rd Records in 2000. He asked me if I wanted to jump on a mixtape, and I gave it a go. Then he asked if I wanted to get on more freestyles.

Parlé: How many mixtapes would you say you've done so far, in your 10 years in the game?
Chalie Boy: Probably around 500 mixtapes, within Dirty 3rd records and features altogether, 500.

Parlé: Really?
Chalie Boy: Yeah.

Parlé: As far as rapping goes, was it what you expected when you got your first taste of it?
Chalie Boy: Wasn't what I expected 'cause I was rapping. I was literally a rookie when it came to rapping. I aint know how people would gravitate to it. People would listen to it and wanted to hear my verses. The fiirst year, I aint even tell 'em that it was me...if they aint like something on it, then I'd try to work on it. But regardless of what you can't just whoop everyone ass. You deal with getting talked about; everyone aint gonna like it.

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