If you know football, you know Deion Sanders. Primetime! Mr. “Must Be The Money.” Neon Deion. The Hall-of-Famer and two-time Super Bowl champion hasn’t really needed an introduction since his meteoric rise in the NFL spotlight, but these days it’s his moves off the field that require conversation. The second season of his reality show, Deion’s Family Playbook premieres on OWN Network on Saturday, November 1st at 9p.m. EST. For those that aren’t familiar, the show features Deion in a light that many might not be familiar with—Deion as a family man raising 10 children. That’s not all however, as Deion also helps run a charter school in Dallas Texas, Prime Prep Academy for grades K-12, and a nonprofit organization, Prime Time Association (aka TRUTH), which teaches young adults through sports and education.


Jagged Edge's eight album, JE Heartbreak II finds the quartet reunited with producer Jermaine Dupri, label So So Def and their original management Mauldin Brand Agency. The theme here is all about bringing back true R&B, so the guys shy away from Rap features or features of any kind, as well as Hip-Hop infused beats. Slow jams are plentiful in this 12 song album and with Bryan Michael Cox assisting the Casey twins on songwriting and production, its very much reminiscent to the sound of early Jagged Edge albums.


Syleena Johnson is one of the bonafide soul singers of our generation and a true R&B Diva that has maintained a penchant for great music since the late 90s. Her musical diary in the form of her Chapter releases have been stacked with hit songs since the original Chapter 1: Love, Pain & Forgiveness was released in 2001. Now with a new label, Blakbyrd Music, Syleena releases her sixth installment of the series, the true to life Chapter 6: Couple's Therapy. While she has grown in her years and through her experiences, the quality of music remains grand. An overall review just wouldn't do here, so we decided to deliver a track by track review of Syleena Johnson's Couple's Therapy.


Singer/Songwriter, Destiny ‘Adia’ Andrews was born in St Louis, Missouri but I’d say she hailed from Huntsville, Alabama. She calls herself a mutt when trying to describe exactly where she’s from, as she grew up all over. But “Huntsville is home” she insists. That’s where all her close relatives and her late grandmother – the most important piece to her puzzle—were from. Admittedly, She should probably come with a warning sign, one that reads “slow down, no assumptions just yet!” If you don’t know, Adia is a Gospel singer but not the average.


Following both the somewhat lackluster albums, No Mercy and Trouble Man, T.I. returns with Paperwork, a 15 track project that is essentially the second in a trilogy of albums from the Atlanta emcee - the first being Paper Trail, released in 2008. There are high moments and low points on Paperwork that ultimately allow for T.I. to showcase that he deserves to remain among some of the greats. Paperwork is intricate to the point where there is a sense that there were different personas at play in the studio. Pharrell executive produced the album, and that is a characteristic he has displayed in his previous trips in that role.


A ‘talented triple-threat that no one saw coming’ is the best way to describe new artist, Luke Christopher. With a collection of mixtapes floating around, Christopher has gained a fan base of followers calling themselves #TMRWGANG. He keeps them engaged by releasing a new song every Tuesday on his SoundCloud and #TMRWGANGTUESDAYS has already received over 2 million plays. His latest mixtape TMRW TMRW Pt. 2 can also be found on SoundCloud featuring contributions from Asher Roth, Baily, Shlohmo and Banks to name a few.

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2011 marks the 86th year that this great country has annually acknowledged in the month of February the achievements of its African American population. Blacks and Black History Month has come along way in that short span of time. What started out as “Negro History Week” back in 1926, fifty years later became what we now know as “Black History Month”. In my research I was unable to uncover the reason for the extension but one can only speculate that it became obvious that our multitudinous contributions could not be covered in just one week.  And, now we are able to add to that long list of inventions, records broken, etcetera; the boastful fact of an African American President of these United States.
Negro History Week was the second week of February between the Birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.  The week long celebration was started by Dr. Carter G Woodson who was the son of former slaves. But, even with his humble beginnings Woodson went on to earn a PhD from Harvard University. (The first African American to earn a PhD from Harvard University was Dr. William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, who founded the NAACP on the 12th of this month 1909, and whose birthday is on the 23rd). Dr.Woodson began the Negro History Week after becoming dissatisfied with the lack of presence that African Americans had in the history books. The week was designed to bring to the attention and magnify the accomplishments of African Americans. It has achieved that and more especially after evolving into a month long celebration.
Thankfully we now know what may have otherwise been hidden or merely passed down like a bad game of telephone with inaccurate information. Now young African Americans can review the accomplishments of other individuals that had the same “limitations” in terms of skin color, and yet still made significant contributions. With this insight we should be empowered realizing that the real limitations are now limited to each individual and we have more access and opportunities than ever before even to the doors of the White House. We should never play the race card considering this rich history of ours even if it is abundantly clear that a situation is racially motivated. I am sure that if President Obama had lost the election we would have said that it was because he was black. But he didn’t lose and that takes the excuse out of our mouths. We can tell our children that they can be anything they want to be if they set their mind to it and this includes areas we have not yet touched. We can be the first in many more areas as we have been the first in so many already.
As we celebrate our history of accomplishments throughout the balance of this month let us teach our children and each other. Let us review the impact African Americans have made to daily life. When you comb your hair, tie your shoes, pass through a stop light or even use a remote remember and appreciate those who made it possible.

2013 marks the 88th year that this great country has annually acknowledged in the month of February the achievements of its African American population. Blacks and Black History Month have come along way in that short span of time. What started out as “Negro History Week” back in 1926, fifty years later became what we now know as “Black History Month”. In my research I was unable to uncover the reason for the extension but one can only speculate that it became obvious that our multitudinous contributions could not be covered in just one week.  And, now we are able to add to that long list of inventions, records broken, etcetera; the boastful fact of an African-American President of these United States.

 

Negro History Week was the second week of February between the Birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.  The week long celebration was started by Dr. Carter G Woodson who was the son of former slaves. But, even with his humble beginnings Woodson went on to earn a PhD from Harvard University. (The first African-American to earn a PhD from Harvard University was Dr. William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, who founded the NAACP on the 12th of this month 1909, and whose birthday is on the 23rd). Dr.Woodson began the Negro History Week after becoming dissatisfied with the lack of presence that African-Americans had in the history books. The week was designed to bring to the attention and magnify the accomplishments of African-Americans. It has achieved that and more especially after evolving into a month long celebration.

 

Thankfully we now know what may have otherwise been hidden or merely passed down like a bad game of telephone with inaccurate information. Now young African Americans can review the accomplishments of other individuals that had the same “limitations” in terms of skin color, and yet still made significant contributions. With this insight we should be empowered realizing that the real limitations are now limited to each individual and we have more access and opportunities than ever before even to the doors of the White House. We should never play the race card considering this rich history of ours even if it is abundantly clear that a situation is racially motivated. I am sure that if President Obama had lost the election we would have said that it was because he was Black. But he didn’t lose and that takes the excuse out of our mouths. We can tell our children that they can be anything they want to be if they set their mind to it and this includes areas we have not yet touched. We can be the first in many more areas as we have been the first in so many already.

 

As we celebrate our history of accomplishments throughout the balance of this month let us teach our children and each other. Let us review the impact African-Americans have made to daily life. When you comb your hair, tie your shoes, pass through a stop light or even use a remote remember and appreciate those who made it possible.

 

 

Also Check Out:
The First African-American Intellectual - Benjamin Banneker
Phillis Wheatley - First Published African-American
Before There Were Pilots in Tuskegee, the 92nd fought in France
Henrietta Lacks - Giving Life Through HeLa Cells
Introducing The NAACP 

 

About The Author
Author: Duan Sanderson

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