As soon as he became the first artist to be signed to J. Cole’s label Dreamville, Bas has had big shoes to fill. Born in Paris, France, Bas moved to Queens, New York, at the age of eight. Before Bas was particularly interested in music, older brother, now known as DJ Moma, did everything he could to introduce Bas to various musical styles, including the electronic influences of the European music scene, which, at the time, was quite different from the popular American music of the era.


Sagging pants and fouled mouth children…”N” this, “N” that…
Slow walks approaching the school building
Prep to take the belts off…
“Hurry…hurry” a friend yells out to hide their cell phones
Metal detectors…
“Empty your pockets”
beep…beep…
“Go!”
No ‘Good Mornings’
No smiles—


To be 100% honest with ya’ll, I almost fainted when I walked into the room where songtress, Leela James had been relaxing on the couch. I greeted everyone and introduced myself and like the cool and beautiful person Ms. James was she said, “Hey sweetie, you got to excuse me for laying down we been traveling all day, but you can lay down and relax with me.” Totally blown away by her “down-to-earth” approach, she was every thing I imagined her to be in person.


If you follow Kachelle Kelly on social media you’ll definitely discover her passion for what she does, she’s positive and she is about her BUSINESS. She can coach her clients from a dream to a reality of what they imagined their business to be with consistency and determination. She has even started a $39 a month program for ones who may be a bit financially tight but would love to ask her a question once a month. I follow her on Instagram and it seems as though she’s very well respected in the city of Houston. She has started a Boss Women Pray and Boss Men Pray movement. She not only have the books, but also shirts in which quite a few familiar faces happily wore for a recent photo shoot.

If you or someone you know is in need of guidance for business-you may want to think of Kachelle Kelly. Read the interview below to learn a little more.

Talent is all around us and with each passing year comes a new star in the making, one that is sure to set 2014 a blaze is R&B crooner Anthony Lewis. In February, the 17 year-old L.A. native released his single, “Candy Rain,” a remix of the 90’s classic from R&B group Soul 4 Real. He has since caught the eyes and ears of every major music and is making strides on Billboard's Hot 100 list. With the song in continuous rotation prompting live performances and more work on his forthcoming debut album to be done Anthony is busier than ever, fortunately he had a few moments to spare to talk about his growing career, his inspiration, and the future of his craft.  See what he had to say below.


New Yorkers know, just being here prepares you for everything the world has to offer. For entertainers that is true double time. Washington Heights bred, Dominican actress, Suveria Mota discovered acting was her passion in high school and she continued to pursue her dream through pursuing her degree at Lehman College in the Bronx. After she got her degree she made the move to Hollywood where things really began to take off. Now with a few roles under her belt and some soon to be released projects, Mota is a talent to look forward to. We got a chance to speak with the actress about what finding success is like for a Latina in Hollywood, the importance of education and what's next for her. Discover the next big name below.


 
 

 

 

2011 marks the 86th year that this great country has annually acknowledged in the month of February the achievements of its African American population. Blacks and Black History Month has come along way in that short span of time. What started out as “Negro History Week” back in 1926, fifty years later became what we now know as “Black History Month”. In my research I was unable to uncover the reason for the extension but one can only speculate that it became obvious that our multitudinous contributions could not be covered in just one week.  And, now we are able to add to that long list of inventions, records broken, etcetera; the boastful fact of an African American President of these United States.
Negro History Week was the second week of February between the Birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.  The week long celebration was started by Dr. Carter G Woodson who was the son of former slaves. But, even with his humble beginnings Woodson went on to earn a PhD from Harvard University. (The first African American to earn a PhD from Harvard University was Dr. William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, who founded the NAACP on the 12th of this month 1909, and whose birthday is on the 23rd). Dr.Woodson began the Negro History Week after becoming dissatisfied with the lack of presence that African Americans had in the history books. The week was designed to bring to the attention and magnify the accomplishments of African Americans. It has achieved that and more especially after evolving into a month long celebration.
Thankfully we now know what may have otherwise been hidden or merely passed down like a bad game of telephone with inaccurate information. Now young African Americans can review the accomplishments of other individuals that had the same “limitations” in terms of skin color, and yet still made significant contributions. With this insight we should be empowered realizing that the real limitations are now limited to each individual and we have more access and opportunities than ever before even to the doors of the White House. We should never play the race card considering this rich history of ours even if it is abundantly clear that a situation is racially motivated. I am sure that if President Obama had lost the election we would have said that it was because he was black. But he didn’t lose and that takes the excuse out of our mouths. We can tell our children that they can be anything they want to be if they set their mind to it and this includes areas we have not yet touched. We can be the first in many more areas as we have been the first in so many already.
As we celebrate our history of accomplishments throughout the balance of this month let us teach our children and each other. Let us review the impact African Americans have made to daily life. When you comb your hair, tie your shoes, pass through a stop light or even use a remote remember and appreciate those who made it possible.

2013 marks the 88th year that this great country has annually acknowledged in the month of February the achievements of its African American population. Blacks and Black History Month have come along way in that short span of time. What started out as “Negro History Week” back in 1926, fifty years later became what we now know as “Black History Month”. In my research I was unable to uncover the reason for the extension but one can only speculate that it became obvious that our multitudinous contributions could not be covered in just one week.  And, now we are able to add to that long list of inventions, records broken, etcetera; the boastful fact of an African-American President of these United States.

 

Negro History Week was the second week of February between the Birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.  The week long celebration was started by Dr. Carter G Woodson who was the son of former slaves. But, even with his humble beginnings Woodson went on to earn a PhD from Harvard University. (The first African-American to earn a PhD from Harvard University was Dr. William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, who founded the NAACP on the 12th of this month 1909, and whose birthday is on the 23rd). Dr.Woodson began the Negro History Week after becoming dissatisfied with the lack of presence that African-Americans had in the history books. The week was designed to bring to the attention and magnify the accomplishments of African-Americans. It has achieved that and more especially after evolving into a month long celebration.

 

Thankfully we now know what may have otherwise been hidden or merely passed down like a bad game of telephone with inaccurate information. Now young African Americans can review the accomplishments of other individuals that had the same “limitations” in terms of skin color, and yet still made significant contributions. With this insight we should be empowered realizing that the real limitations are now limited to each individual and we have more access and opportunities than ever before even to the doors of the White House. We should never play the race card considering this rich history of ours even if it is abundantly clear that a situation is racially motivated. I am sure that if President Obama had lost the election we would have said that it was because he was Black. But he didn’t lose and that takes the excuse out of our mouths. We can tell our children that they can be anything they want to be if they set their mind to it and this includes areas we have not yet touched. We can be the first in many more areas as we have been the first in so many already.

 

As we celebrate our history of accomplishments throughout the balance of this month let us teach our children and each other. Let us review the impact African-Americans have made to daily life. When you comb your hair, tie your shoes, pass through a stop light or even use a remote remember and appreciate those who made it possible.

 

 

Also Check Out:
The First African-American Intellectual - Benjamin Banneker
Phillis Wheatley - First Published African-American
Before There Were Pilots in Tuskegee, the 92nd fought in France
Henrietta Lacks - Giving Life Through HeLa Cells
Introducing The NAACP 

 

About The Author
Author: Duan Sanderson

Our Supporters:

 

twitter
facebook
contact-us