I was first introduced to Jhené Aiko on Kendrick Lamar's "Growing Apart." Her voice is gentle and somewhat tinged with a sultriness that often encroaches on cutting aggression. Aiko understands where to emphasize her voice, wrapping it around the lyrics to achieve a hypnotic mix of hip hop and R&B. Souled Out, the debut from the singer is made up of mid-temp melodies that emerge as freestyles, rather than songs. This is not a bad thing because Aiko has stated that her process of recording music is one of letting it unfold rather than rushing.

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Originality is such a hard thing to come by these days that it’s no wonder you’ll see so many movies, TV shows and music that look and sound the same.
 When is the last time you heard a song or movie that you couldn’t compare to something else prior? Probably never. That doesn’t mean that originality or creativity has died, but just means that people have a brand new way of seeing things. One of the greatest movies of all times, Star Wars is often compared to Star Trek. They have forums of geeks and nerds sighting the familiarities between these two, I’ll save you the time and say that I’ve seen all the Star Wars series and none of the Star Trek franchise despite their many TV shows and spin-off movies but I'm aware of how they tend to overlap each other in some aspects.


Blacc Hollywood is the fifth studio album from Wiz Khalifa - the rapper known for creating chill songs about getting high and living the high life. Being more of a fan of his mixtapes because he seems to offer more impactful, heavy-hitting rhymes on those, listening to Blacc Hollywood solidified my opinion even further.


Being born in the 90’s certainly touched the new up and coming triple-threat artist Jo’zzy aka @dopebyaccident in a special way. She’s the protégé’ of super producer Timbaland and a talented singer/songwriter/rapper. Not only is the 90’s an inspiration and influence, but a way of life for this 24 year old; whose real name is Jocelyn Donald. She says of new single “Tryna Wife”, “It’s just nostalgic music and only the beginning. Some of today’s R&B and Hip-Hop can be so watered down and cookie-cutter, but my style of music makes you think of the 90’s.”


"They only get to see a certain part of your life and it’s not even fifty percent. It may be about fifteen percent of your life that these people are getting to watch so that’s never a good thing because you become this fifteen percent of what people get to see and there’s way more to most of us that are on that show..."  ~Bambi


“One thing I feel that happens a lot on the urban side of music, not as much on the mainstream pop side of music is that if artists don't come out for a few years, we forget that we loved them. This was not just some song I liked, but this was my favorite group in the world. I feel like the urban audience, we don't hold our stars up like the pop audience do. Their stars will put out an album tomorrow and it will still be double, triple, quadruple platinum…”  
~Brandon Casey of Jagged Edge 


 
 

 

 

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Baseball has always been a game partially defined by
one raw, unadulterated element: the home run ball.
And no one could hit the ball quite like Josh Gibson.
Born in Buena Vista, Georgia on December 21st, 1911,
Gibson began playing baseball in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
at the age of 16 with an amateur club. The aspiring
electrician's play caught the eye of the Pittsburgh
Crawfords of the Negro League, but Josh wound up
signing with the Homestead Grays, playing catcher and
beginning a storied career.
Gibson played 16 years in the Negro Leagues as well
as for President Rafael Trujillo's team in the Dominican
League with other stints in Mexico and Cuba. Over that
time, his hitting prowess became near mythical, with
many calling Babe Ruth 'the white Josh Gibson' as
deference to his skills. He reportedly hit 800 home
runs over his career, one of them which would make him
the only man to have ever hit a fair ball out of Yankee
Stadium. In addition, he was the first manager of the
Santurce Crabbers in the Puerto Rico Baseball League.
His career and his life ended due to a stroke caused
by a pre-existing brain tumor at the age of 35 in 1947.
But Josh Gibson's legacy lived on, with Jackie Robinson breaking
Major League Baseball's color barrier a couple of months
later and with Gibson being elected to the Baseball
Hall of Fame along with Satchel Paige and teammate Buck
Leonard in 1972, ultimately showing the powerful skill
that would make baseball in America that much better.

Baseball has always been a game partially defined by one raw, unadulterated element: the home run ball. And no one could hit the ball quite like Josh Gibson. Born in Buena Vista, Georgia on December 21st, 1911, Gibson began playing baseball in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at the age of 16 with an amateur club. The aspiring electrician's play caught the eye of the Pittsburgh Crawfords of the Negro League, but Josh wound up signing with the Homestead Grays, playing catcher and beginning a storied career.


Gibson played 16 years in the Negro Leagues as well as for President Rafael Trujillo's team in the Dominican League with other stints in Mexico and Cuba. Over that time, his hitting prowess became near mythical, with many calling Babe Ruth 'the white Josh Gibson' as deference to his skills. He reportedly hit 800 homeruns over his career, one of them which would make him the only man to have ever hit a fair ball out of Yankee Stadium. In addition, he was the first manager of the Santurce Crabbers in the Puerto Rico Baseball League.  

 

His career and his life ended due to a stroke caused by a pre-existing brain tumor at the age of 35 in 1947. But Josh Gibson's legacy lived on, with Jackie Robinson breaking Major League Baseball's color barrier a couple of months later and with Gibson being elected to the BaseballHall of Fame along with Satchel Paige and teammate Buck Leonard in 1972, ultimately showing the powerful skill that would make baseball in America that much better.

 

 

Also Check Out:

The Story Behind Black History Month

Althea Gibson - Early Black Dominance in Sports

Lt. Colonel Allen Allensworth - Slavery to Service

Phillis Wheatley - First Published African-American

Charles Hamilton Houston - Civil Rights Attorney

 

 

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Author: AdministratorWebsite: www.parlemagazine.com

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