Ever wonder what people in densely populated areas and non culturally diverse suburbs tuly think about minorities? On its surface the newly released film, The Suspect looks at just that. It goes much deeper though on a journey of suspense for a tangled web since the viewer is kept in the dark about several facts throughout the film. WIth a run time of just 98 minutes the viewer gets a lot in a short time and thefilm doesn't feel rushed at all, in fact it plays itself out at seemingly just the right pace.


“Spare the rod, spoil the child.” “It takes a village to raise a child.” These are quotes that we are all familiar with by now. However, does Facebook count as the “village” needed to raise children or is there a new trend that is getting out of hand? For the past couple of years, there has been a growing popularity of videos showing parents disciplining their children in front of a camera and posting them Facebook. While some videos feature a parent disciplining a child on camera to post on the child's Facebook page as punishment for misbehavior on the site, others have simply posted videos of them punishing their child on their own pages. So is posting videos of a child's punishment on social media a necessary part of the discipline, or does it go overboard? A Michigan mother and 2 others are probably asking themselves that question while they are behind bars.


Recently, I presented at the 15th annual Fathers and Family Coalition of America conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. My presentation focused on how fathering practitioners can use their life experience as a springboard to reach and teach fathers about the importance of their role as fathers. During my presentation one of the young fathers asked a very courageous question. Like many single fathers, he gets his son every other weekend and he questioned the significance of his time with his son. He stated that when he picks up his son on Fridays, before you know it the weekend is over and now he has to wait 12 days to see him again. He wanted to know what he could do to maintain his relevance.


Ever since Olivia Pope came on the scene a couple of years ago she has dominated the social media news feeds of Urban America.  She has elements of many women we all know and it's great having a familiar face on television to look to.  When Mary Jane Paul emerged on the scene a year or so ago, things got real.  Now that Being Mary Jane is a full season in, and with Scandal three seasons in, we figured it was time to look at the women that are these characters.  Given the chance who would you choose to date, to be a friend to?  Who could you actually stand to be around?


The latest Jason Derulo album, Talk Dirty, is chock full of party anthems and “get hype” tracks. The album starts off with Jason’s new smash hit, "Talk Dirty" (featuring 2 Chainz), which has spent the last sixteen weeks near the top of Billboard’s “The Hot 100” and currently sits at number four. Derulo has brought in many other popular Hip-Hop artists to collaborate on this record, including Snoop Dogg, TYGA, Kid Ink, and Pitbull. 


There was a huge debate recently about the Mt. Rushmore of the NBA.  Choosing the four greatest players to have ever played the sport of basketball proved to be quite the challenge and there is still no clear and decisive agreement on just four. The Mt. Rushmore of Hip-Hop may prove to be just as difficult, but we figured we'd give it a try and see what the readers think.


 
 

 

 

Baseball has always been a game partially defined by
one raw, unadulterated element: the home run ball.
And no one could hit the ball quite like Josh Gibson.
Born in Buena Vista, Georgia on December 21st, 1911,
Gibson began playing baseball in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
at the age of 16 with an amateur club. The aspiring
electrician's play caught the eye of the Pittsburgh
Crawfords of the Negro League, but Josh wound up
signing with the Homestead Grays, playing catcher and
beginning a storied career.
Gibson played 16 years in the Negro Leagues as well
as for President Rafael Trujillo's team in the Dominican
League with other stints in Mexico and Cuba. Over that
time, his hitting prowess became near mythical, with
many calling Babe Ruth 'the white Josh Gibson' as
deference to his skills. He reportedly hit 800 home
runs over his career, one of them which would make him
the only man to have ever hit a fair ball out of Yankee
Stadium. In addition, he was the first manager of the
Santurce Crabbers in the Puerto Rico Baseball League.
His career and his life ended due to a stroke caused
by a pre-existing brain tumor at the age of 35 in 1947.
But Josh Gibson's legacy lived on, with Jackie Robinson breaking
Major League Baseball's color barrier a couple of months
later and with Gibson being elected to the Baseball
Hall of Fame along with Satchel Paige and teammate Buck
Leonard in 1972, ultimately showing the powerful skill
that would make baseball in America that much better.

Baseball has always been a game partially defined by one raw, unadulterated element: the home run ball. And no one could hit the ball quite like Josh Gibson. Born in Buena Vista, Georgia on December 21st, 1911, Gibson began playing baseball in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at the age of 16 with an amateur club. The aspiring electrician's play caught the eye of the Pittsburgh Crawfords of the Negro League, but Josh wound up signing with the Homestead Grays, playing catcher and beginning a storied career.


Gibson played 16 years in the Negro Leagues as well as for President Rafael Trujillo's team in the Dominican League with other stints in Mexico and Cuba. Over that time, his hitting prowess became near mythical, with many calling Babe Ruth 'the white Josh Gibson' as deference to his skills. He reportedly hit 800 homeruns over his career, one of them which would make him the only man to have ever hit a fair ball out of Yankee Stadium. In addition, he was the first manager of the Santurce Crabbers in the Puerto Rico Baseball League.  

 

His career and his life ended due to a stroke caused by a pre-existing brain tumor at the age of 35 in 1947. But Josh Gibson's legacy lived on, with Jackie Robinson breaking Major League Baseball's color barrier a couple of months later and with Gibson being elected to the BaseballHall of Fame along with Satchel Paige and teammate Buck Leonard in 1972, ultimately showing the powerful skill that would make baseball in America that much better.

 

 

Also Check Out:

The Story Behind Black History Month

Althea Gibson - Early Black Dominance in Sports

Lt. Colonel Allen Allensworth - Slavery to Service

Phillis Wheatley - First Published African-American

Charles Hamilton Houston - Civil Rights Attorney

 

 

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