If you know football, you know Deion Sanders. Primetime! Mr. “Must Be The Money.” Neon Deion. The Hall-of-Famer and two-time Super Bowl champion hasn’t really needed an introduction since his meteoric rise in the NFL spotlight, but these days it’s his moves off the field that require conversation. The second season of his reality show, Deion’s Family Playbook premieres on OWN Network on Saturday, November 1st at 9p.m. EST. For those that aren’t familiar, the show features Deion in a light that many might not be familiar with—Deion as a family man raising 10 children. That’s not all however, as Deion also helps run a charter school in Dallas Texas, Prime Prep Academy for grades K-12, and a nonprofit organization, Prime Time Association (aka TRUTH), which teaches young adults through sports and education.


Jagged Edge's eight album, JE Heartbreak II finds the quartet reunited with producer Jermaine Dupri, label So So Def and their original management Mauldin Brand Agency. The theme here is all about bringing back true R&B, so the guys shy away from Rap features or features of any kind, as well as Hip-Hop infused beats. Slow jams are plentiful in this 12 song album and with Bryan Michael Cox assisting the Casey twins on songwriting and production, its very much reminiscent to the sound of early Jagged Edge albums.


Syleena Johnson is one of the bonafide soul singers of our generation and a true R&B Diva that has maintained a penchant for great music since the late 90s. Her musical diary in the form of her Chapter releases have been stacked with hit songs since the original Chapter 1: Love, Pain & Forgiveness was released in 2001. Now with a new label, Blakbyrd Music, Syleena releases her sixth installment of the series, the true to life Chapter 6: Couple's Therapy. While she has grown in her years and through her experiences, the quality of music remains grand. An overall review just wouldn't do here, so we decided to deliver a track by track review of Syleena Johnson's Couple's Therapy.


Singer/Songwriter, Destiny ‘Adia’ Andrews was born in St Louis, Missouri but I’d say she hailed from Huntsville, Alabama. She calls herself a mutt when trying to describe exactly where she’s from, as she grew up all over. But “Huntsville is home” she insists. That’s where all her close relatives and her late grandmother – the most important piece to her puzzle—were from. Admittedly, She should probably come with a warning sign, one that reads “slow down, no assumptions just yet!” If you don’t know, Adia is a Gospel singer but not the average.


Following both the somewhat lackluster albums, No Mercy and Trouble Man, T.I. returns with Paperwork, a 15 track project that is essentially the second in a trilogy of albums from the Atlanta emcee - the first being Paper Trail, released in 2008. There are high moments and low points on Paperwork that ultimately allow for T.I. to showcase that he deserves to remain among some of the greats. Paperwork is intricate to the point where there is a sense that there were different personas at play in the studio. Pharrell executive produced the album, and that is a characteristic he has displayed in his previous trips in that role.


A ‘talented triple-threat that no one saw coming’ is the best way to describe new artist, Luke Christopher. With a collection of mixtapes floating around, Christopher has gained a fan base of followers calling themselves #TMRWGANG. He keeps them engaged by releasing a new song every Tuesday on his SoundCloud and #TMRWGANGTUESDAYS has already received over 2 million plays. His latest mixtape TMRW TMRW Pt. 2 can also be found on SoundCloud featuring contributions from Asher Roth, Baily, Shlohmo and Banks to name a few.



 
 

 

 


First he took over the streets with his single "Cashing Out"  Since,  he’s already collaborated with artists such as Ke$ha, Wale and B.O.B.  At just 22 years-old, rapper Ca$h Out has made major strides in his budding career. Recently signed with Epic Records, we had the chance to speak with Ca$h Out about his successes as well as some of his future endeavors.  Here's what the Atlanta bred emcee had to say...

 


Parlé Magazine:
First of all Ca$h Out thank you for your time this afternoon. How did you go about forming your name?
Ca$h Out: Just in the booth, man. Rapping with one of my partners, I just said something about cashing out, and it just became a name by my saying it.


Parlé:
As a child did you always want to be a rapper or did you have other aspirations?
Ca$h Out:  I just started rapping. I never wanted to be a rapper when I was young. I like listening to the music, but I never knew that I had the talent to do it until I actually did it. It was never my intention. I always wanted to play basketball.


Parlé: Who were some of the rappers you looked up to when you were starting your career?
Ca$h Out: I like Drake. I like Jeezy as far as the street side goes. I’m basically trying to perfect myself and critique everything that I have done. I’m focused on what I’ve got going on. 


Parlé: Well, how long have you actually been rapping and performing?
Ca$h Out: Going on two and a half years.


Parlé: Considering it takes people years to get a name for themselves in the industry, how did you get your music in the right hands?
Ca$h Out: Just grinding and putting in leg work in my city. Atlanta is the music world. You know it’s poppin’ down here. If you’ve got a hot song and you’re pushing it the right way by doing what you need to do and staying prayed up, everything will work out in the end and that is exactly what I did.


Parlé:  What’s your process of getting in the right mindset and psyche before you get in the studio and the booth?Ca$h Out: It’s just the beat man. Once I hear it, I’m just going to roll me up one and have me a sip and go in there. After I hear that I’m ready to go. I’m getting my thoughts together.


Parlé: As a young artist, your mother is managing your career. How is it working with her as a manager? Is that hard for you?
Ca$h Out: No, she just handles everything as far as scheduling, hotels and shows.  I really just put everything in place and she handles the personal things. I can’t do everything as an artist so she takes care of those things and keeps me on schedule.


Parlé:
Cashin’ Out was your first popular song to hit the airways. Was it the first song of yours that you heard on the radio?
Ca$h Out: My first song I heard on the radio was "I Got It." That was my first street anthem. It was something I was doing on my own before I got with Bases Loaded.  It had a crazy buzz in my city so it got played on the radio.


Parlé:  What went through your head when you heard it on the radio?
Ca$h Out:  I was definitely happy. That was my first time being on the radio. That was a blessing.


Parlé: Then you signed with Epic Records. What was going through your mind after you signed your deal? And your meeting with LA Reid?
Ca$h Out:  Well, we did four songs. Definitely "Cashin’ Out" because that was already on the charts. We did three other songs that he liked very much. He actually made me perform them again. So I performed for him twice. The deal changed and went from one thing to another, and we got the paperwork done then it was time to get a game plan and keep it moving.


Parlé: Were you nervous about performing for him?
Ca$h Out: It was an opportunity. You can’t be nervous when you get a big opportunity because you’ll mess it up, so I was more so thinking of the opportunity. I don’t really get nervous. I don’t let that happen. I guess I’m  that the type of person. I’m a lion. No fear. That’s my sign. So we just go with the flow and get results in the end. Whatever you do, you can’t be nervous. You can’t panic. That’s something you do when your young, but when you go into it as a man there’s nothing to worry about at the end of the day. You’ve got to keep yourself calm and be ready for whatever.


Parlé: What are you working on next? You have your song out with B.O.B. right now, "Exclusive"? What’s next for you?
Ca$h Out: That’s just going crazy on its own and already charting. I’ll be putting work in. That’s what we did anyway on the independent side. It’s going to be another cold summer like "Cashin’ Out." We just dropped this single with DJ Spins, he’s back on the beat. The first single was "Cashin’ Out" with DJ Spins.  It was the number one single five weeks straight- a platinum single. So we’re back in the lab with it. We went back to the roots. Definitely real crazy, man. Definitely another cold summer. We’re looking at a smash hit. I guess after this smash, it’s going to be album time.


Parlé: Yeah, I saw that your album is to be released this year. Do you have a release date yet?
Ca$h Out: No set date. Just getting this money and building my fan base up so I can do the right numbers. I’m trying to make one of these tours before the album. There’s no rush, that’s why the album is called Patience. We’re just making Epic money. We’ve got a platinum single. The first urban platinum single on Epic since LA Reid has been in the building.  The first gold single and first number one urban single, since LA Reid has been with Epic so we’ve got a lot of accolades before the album drops. So we’re looking good.


Parlé: A lot of times with rappers, they’ll have one hit song and then you don’t really hear from them again. How do you ensure that you’re not going to be a one-hit-wonder?
Ca$h Out: I’m blessed. A lot of people don’t know that you’re in the studio every night.  They never knew that you already had that second single, "Hold Up," in the chambers. It was already on 106 & Park. As soon as I dropped it they chopped it up. It was going crazy in New York. It went crazy around the world. I don’t even have to use the beat. I do that a cappella at my shows and get a crazy response. Its a strong hook and the beat is crazy. So I already knew what I had in the chambers, it’s just about getting it out there. You’ve got to be patient. Let the critics talk and then, bam, just surprise them.


Parlé: That’s true, but when it comes to negative feedback and press what are your responses? How do you react and handle it?
Ca$h Out: You’ve got to be able to handle that well. They’re always going to be negative at first until you prove them wrong. That’s even with "Cashin’ Out."  People say “eh, I’m not feeling it.” Then when it goes number one they’ll say, “I bought that record!” It doesn’t really mean anything to me. When I first started rapping I knew I had to get better. I’m one hundred times better from when I first started rapping. It was about the repetition and never giving up. Even a couple of DJs said to me when I started rapping, “yo, you’ve got to step it up.” That was before "Cashin’ Out," and once they said that, that gave me that fuel. Like when Lebron went to Miami, it just gave him that fuel to go hard. I had a DJ meeting and they just kept it real with me. That just put the fire under my ass and made me go. I don’t know what happened. I don’t know if God came down and said, “Hey, I like the way you handled that now go forward,” but I just killed it. I made the best mixtape, top to bottom. I made the hottest song of last year. "Hold Up" as the second single.  Dropped "Keisha" and closed the BET Awards out, all types of things. I had a great year, and now it’s time to turn up again this year.


Parlé: Was there anything else you wanted to share with your fans?
Ca$h Out: Go get that single "Come Here," produced by DJ Spins. Get "Exclusive" with B.O.B. The music speaks for itself. Follow me on twitter @TheRealCashOut follow me on instagram @1CashOut. Just trying to smash. We’re going hard. 

 

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Author: Thomas C. Burrell

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