Being born in the 90’s certainly touched the new up and coming triple-threat artist Jo’zzy aka @dopebyaccident in a special way. She’s the protégé’ of super producer Timbaland and a talented singer/songwriter/rapper. Not only is the 90’s an inspiration and influence, but a way of life for this 24 year old; whose real name is Jocelyn Donald. She says of new single “Tryna Wife”, “It’s just nostalgic music and only the beginning. Some of today’s R&B and Hip-Hop can be so watered down and cookie-cutter, but my style of music makes you think of the 90’s.”


"They only get to see a certain part of your life and it’s not even fifty percent. It may be about fifteen percent of your life that these people are getting to watch so that’s never a good thing because you become this fifteen percent of what people get to see and there’s way more to most of us that are on that show..."  ~Bambi


“One thing I feel that happens a lot on the urban side of music, not as much on the mainstream pop side of music is that if artists don't come out for a few years, we forget that we loved them. This was not just some song I liked, but this was my favorite group in the world. I feel like the urban audience, we don't hold our stars up like the pop audience do. Their stars will put out an album tomorrow and it will still be double, triple, quadruple platinum…”  
~Brandon Casey of Jagged Edge 


Are you a fan of good 90’s music? A fan of music that allows you to still leave something to the imagination? Then you might want to cop that new Hi-Five The EP. Yes, that’s right—Billy, Faruq, Marcus, Shannon and Treston aka Hi-5 are making a comeback and Billy Covington and Faruq Evans assured Parlé Magazine in a recent interview, that they’re here to stay!


You've probably been a fan of Rico Love for years and didn't even know it. He has penned and produced chart topping hits for Usher, Keri Hilson, Fantasia, Chris Brown and Beyoncé to name a few. His EP, Discrete Luxury, was released late in 2013 and includes six new tracks including hit singles "They Don't Know" and "B*tches be Like." The EP serves as the prelude this debut album, Turn the Lights On, which is also the singer/songwriter’s memorable catch phrase. While Rico has made a name for himself mostly behind the scenes, the new record is his chance to not only expand his repertoire but show and prove that he has what it takes as a solo artist.


Kareem Nelson, didn’t tell the typical childhood story I expected to hear in a recent interview with the Wheelchairs Against Guns (W.A.G.) founder. He described a great childhood, a mother that provided everything he wanted and needed, if not more. As an only child, he said he had the best of everything, but the “streets” were still calling. “I chose the streets,” Nelson admitted. There was a sense of brotherhood and freedom that led him to the lifestyle that so many of our young Black men follow. Fast money, cars and women is the name of the game and where so many get caught up. For twelve years Nelson was about that life, until one night everything changed.


 
 

 

 

×

Notice

Please enter your DISQUS subdomain in order to use the 'DISQUS Comments for Joomla!' plugin. If you don't have a DISQUS account, register for one here


First he took over the streets with his single "Cashing Out"  Since,  he’s already collaborated with artists such as Ke$ha, Wale and B.O.B.  At just 22 years-old, rapper Ca$h Out has made major strides in his budding career. Recently signed with Epic Records, we had the chance to speak with Ca$h Out about his successes as well as some of his future endeavors.  Here's what the Atlanta bred emcee had to say...

 


Parlé Magazine:
First of all Ca$h Out thank you for your time this afternoon. How did you go about forming your name?
Ca$h Out: Just in the booth, man. Rapping with one of my partners, I just said something about cashing out, and it just became a name by my saying it.


Parlé:
As a child did you always want to be a rapper or did you have other aspirations?
Ca$h Out:  I just started rapping. I never wanted to be a rapper when I was young. I like listening to the music, but I never knew that I had the talent to do it until I actually did it. It was never my intention. I always wanted to play basketball.


Parlé: Who were some of the rappers you looked up to when you were starting your career?
Ca$h Out: I like Drake. I like Jeezy as far as the street side goes. I’m basically trying to perfect myself and critique everything that I have done. I’m focused on what I’ve got going on. 


Parlé: Well, how long have you actually been rapping and performing?
Ca$h Out: Going on two and a half years.


Parlé: Considering it takes people years to get a name for themselves in the industry, how did you get your music in the right hands?
Ca$h Out: Just grinding and putting in leg work in my city. Atlanta is the music world. You know it’s poppin’ down here. If you’ve got a hot song and you’re pushing it the right way by doing what you need to do and staying prayed up, everything will work out in the end and that is exactly what I did.


Parlé:  What’s your process of getting in the right mindset and psyche before you get in the studio and the booth?Ca$h Out: It’s just the beat man. Once I hear it, I’m just going to roll me up one and have me a sip and go in there. After I hear that I’m ready to go. I’m getting my thoughts together.


Parlé: As a young artist, your mother is managing your career. How is it working with her as a manager? Is that hard for you?
Ca$h Out: No, she just handles everything as far as scheduling, hotels and shows.  I really just put everything in place and she handles the personal things. I can’t do everything as an artist so she takes care of those things and keeps me on schedule.


Parlé:
Cashin’ Out was your first popular song to hit the airways. Was it the first song of yours that you heard on the radio?
Ca$h Out: My first song I heard on the radio was "I Got It." That was my first street anthem. It was something I was doing on my own before I got with Bases Loaded.  It had a crazy buzz in my city so it got played on the radio.


Parlé:  What went through your head when you heard it on the radio?
Ca$h Out:  I was definitely happy. That was my first time being on the radio. That was a blessing.


Parlé: Then you signed with Epic Records. What was going through your mind after you signed your deal? And your meeting with LA Reid?
Ca$h Out:  Well, we did four songs. Definitely "Cashin’ Out" because that was already on the charts. We did three other songs that he liked very much. He actually made me perform them again. So I performed for him twice. The deal changed and went from one thing to another, and we got the paperwork done then it was time to get a game plan and keep it moving.


Parlé: Were you nervous about performing for him?
Ca$h Out: It was an opportunity. You can’t be nervous when you get a big opportunity because you’ll mess it up, so I was more so thinking of the opportunity. I don’t really get nervous. I don’t let that happen. I guess I’m  that the type of person. I’m a lion. No fear. That’s my sign. So we just go with the flow and get results in the end. Whatever you do, you can’t be nervous. You can’t panic. That’s something you do when your young, but when you go into it as a man there’s nothing to worry about at the end of the day. You’ve got to keep yourself calm and be ready for whatever.


Parlé: What are you working on next? You have your song out with B.O.B. right now, "Exclusive"? What’s next for you?
Ca$h Out: That’s just going crazy on its own and already charting. I’ll be putting work in. That’s what we did anyway on the independent side. It’s going to be another cold summer like "Cashin’ Out." We just dropped this single with DJ Spins, he’s back on the beat. The first single was "Cashin’ Out" with DJ Spins.  It was the number one single five weeks straight- a platinum single. So we’re back in the lab with it. We went back to the roots. Definitely real crazy, man. Definitely another cold summer. We’re looking at a smash hit. I guess after this smash, it’s going to be album time.


Parlé: Yeah, I saw that your album is to be released this year. Do you have a release date yet?
Ca$h Out: No set date. Just getting this money and building my fan base up so I can do the right numbers. I’m trying to make one of these tours before the album. There’s no rush, that’s why the album is called Patience. We’re just making Epic money. We’ve got a platinum single. The first urban platinum single on Epic since LA Reid has been in the building.  The first gold single and first number one urban single, since LA Reid has been with Epic so we’ve got a lot of accolades before the album drops. So we’re looking good.


Parlé: A lot of times with rappers, they’ll have one hit song and then you don’t really hear from them again. How do you ensure that you’re not going to be a one-hit-wonder?
Ca$h Out: I’m blessed. A lot of people don’t know that you’re in the studio every night.  They never knew that you already had that second single, "Hold Up," in the chambers. It was already on 106 & Park. As soon as I dropped it they chopped it up. It was going crazy in New York. It went crazy around the world. I don’t even have to use the beat. I do that a cappella at my shows and get a crazy response. Its a strong hook and the beat is crazy. So I already knew what I had in the chambers, it’s just about getting it out there. You’ve got to be patient. Let the critics talk and then, bam, just surprise them.


Parlé: That’s true, but when it comes to negative feedback and press what are your responses? How do you react and handle it?
Ca$h Out: You’ve got to be able to handle that well. They’re always going to be negative at first until you prove them wrong. That’s even with "Cashin’ Out."  People say “eh, I’m not feeling it.” Then when it goes number one they’ll say, “I bought that record!” It doesn’t really mean anything to me. When I first started rapping I knew I had to get better. I’m one hundred times better from when I first started rapping. It was about the repetition and never giving up. Even a couple of DJs said to me when I started rapping, “yo, you’ve got to step it up.” That was before "Cashin’ Out," and once they said that, that gave me that fuel. Like when Lebron went to Miami, it just gave him that fuel to go hard. I had a DJ meeting and they just kept it real with me. That just put the fire under my ass and made me go. I don’t know what happened. I don’t know if God came down and said, “Hey, I like the way you handled that now go forward,” but I just killed it. I made the best mixtape, top to bottom. I made the hottest song of last year. "Hold Up" as the second single.  Dropped "Keisha" and closed the BET Awards out, all types of things. I had a great year, and now it’s time to turn up again this year.


Parlé: Was there anything else you wanted to share with your fans?
Ca$h Out: Go get that single "Come Here," produced by DJ Spins. Get "Exclusive" with B.O.B. The music speaks for itself. Follow me on twitter @TheRealCashOut follow me on instagram @1CashOut. Just trying to smash. We’re going hard. 

 

Also Check Out:
Jay-Z Turns Sights To Athlete Representation
Five Minutes with R & B Singer, Bobby V
Singer/Songwriter Tocarra Hamilton Discusses Life & Universal Records Deal
Music Producer Selasi Duse Takes on The Kandi Factory
Mindless Behavior - Matured, Motivated, But Still Mindless

 

About The Author
Author: Thomas C. Burrell

Our Supporters:

 

twitter
facebook
contact-us