Ever wonder what people in densely populated areas and non culturally diverse suburbs tuly think about minorities? On its surface the newly released film, The Suspect looks at just that. It goes much deeper though on a journey of suspense for a tangled web since the viewer is kept in the dark about several facts throughout the film. WIth a run time of just 98 minutes the viewer gets a lot in a short time and thefilm doesn't feel rushed at all, in fact it plays itself out at seemingly just the right pace.


“Spare the rod, spoil the child.” “It takes a village to raise a child.” These are quotes that we are all familiar with by now. However, does Facebook count as the “village” needed to raise children or is there a new trend that is getting out of hand? For the past couple of years, there has been a growing popularity of videos showing parents disciplining their children in front of a camera and posting them Facebook. While some videos feature a parent disciplining a child on camera to post on the child's Facebook page as punishment for misbehavior on the site, others have simply posted videos of them punishing their child on their own pages. So is posting videos of a child's punishment on social media a necessary part of the discipline, or does it go overboard? A Michigan mother and 2 others are probably asking themselves that question while they are behind bars.


Recently, I presented at the 15th annual Fathers and Family Coalition of America conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. My presentation focused on how fathering practitioners can use their life experience as a springboard to reach and teach fathers about the importance of their role as fathers. During my presentation one of the young fathers asked a very courageous question. Like many single fathers, he gets his son every other weekend and he questioned the significance of his time with his son. He stated that when he picks up his son on Fridays, before you know it the weekend is over and now he has to wait 12 days to see him again. He wanted to know what he could do to maintain his relevance.


Ever since Olivia Pope came on the scene a couple of years ago she has dominated the social media news feeds of Urban America.  She has elements of many women we all know and it's great having a familiar face on television to look to.  When Mary Jane Paul emerged on the scene a year or so ago, things got real.  Now that Being Mary Jane is a full season in, and with Scandal three seasons in, we figured it was time to look at the women that are these characters.  Given the chance who would you choose to date, to be a friend to?  Who could you actually stand to be around?


The latest Jason Derulo album, Talk Dirty, is chock full of party anthems and “get hype” tracks. The album starts off with Jason’s new smash hit, "Talk Dirty" (featuring 2 Chainz), which has spent the last sixteen weeks near the top of Billboard’s “The Hot 100” and currently sits at number four. Derulo has brought in many other popular Hip-Hop artists to collaborate on this record, including Snoop Dogg, TYGA, Kid Ink, and Pitbull. 


There was a huge debate recently about the Mt. Rushmore of the NBA.  Choosing the four greatest players to have ever played the sport of basketball proved to be quite the challenge and there is still no clear and decisive agreement on just four. The Mt. Rushmore of Hip-Hop may prove to be just as difficult, but we figured we'd give it a try and see what the readers think.


 
 

 

 

Neil deGrasse Tyson – The Prodigy Astronomer
 
Imagine having one of the world's most famous scientists ask you to attend one of the most prestigious universities in the country.  Wait, there's more.  You're 15 years old, he's Carl Sagan, a world-renown astronomer, and the school is Cornell University.  Well, that is exactly what happened to Neil deGrasse Tyson, the director of the Hayden Planetarium.
 
Dr. Tyson was born and raised in the Bronx, New York City on October 5, 1958.  His parents were Cyril and Sunchita Tyson.  Cyril was a sociologist and human resource commissioner for a New York City Mayor, and Sunchita was a gerontologist.  Neil attended the Bronx High School of Science and passionately studied astronomy.  He made a name for himself in the astronomy community by giving lectures at the age of 15.
 
Even though Carl Sagan, a faculty member at Cornell at the time, contacted Dr. Tyson to make a pitch for his attendance at Cornell, Neil chose Harvard University instead.  There, he majored in Physics, was a member of the crew team as a Freshman and lettered in wrestling in his Senior year.  After receiving his B.A., Dr. Tyson went on to attend the University of Texas at Austin were he won a gold medal along with the dance team, in the International Latin Ballroom style.  He began a doctoral program but transferred to Columbia University where he earned a PhD in Astrophysics.
 
As director of the Hayden Planetarium, Dr. Tyson has removed Pluto from its place as the ninth planet in our solar system.  He made the controversial decision to change Pluto's classification to “dwarf planet.”  Hate mail ensued but his assessment was upheld by the I.A.U.  The reasoning is that terrestrial objects should be grouped together; gas giants together and Pluto with other like objects.
 
The author of several popular astronomy books, Tyson has also written for Natural History magazine, a column titled “Universe.”  He has also held a Presidential appointment on the Commission on the Future of the United States Aerospace Industry and on the Presidential Commission on Implementation of US Exploration Policy (also known as the Moon Mars and Beyond Commission).  He also received the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal.
 
Dr. Tyson's ability to communicate his passion for astronomy is not confined to writing.  He has also hosted the PBS miniseries Nova and has appeared regularly on the series The Universe, which can be seen on the History Channel.  There have also been numerous media appearances on The Colbert Report, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Late Night with Conan O'Brien, NPR and CNN.
 
Dr. Tyson lives in New York City with his wife and two children.
 
So, the next time you look up at the stars, think of Neil deGrasse Tyson and know that no dream is out of reach no matter how far away it may seem.
 


Imagine having one of the world's most famous scientists ask you to attend one of the most prestigious universities in the country.  Wait, there's more.  You're 15 years old, he's Carl Sagan, a world-renown astronomer, and the school is Cornell University.  Well, that is exactly what happened to Neil deGrasse Tyson, the director of the Hayden Planetarium.


Dr. Tyson was born and raised in the Bronx, New York City on October 5, 1958.  His parents were Cyril and Sunchita Tyson.  Cyril was a sociologist and human resource commissioner for a New York City Mayor, and Sunchita was a gerontologist.  Neil attended the Bronx High School of Science and passionately studied astronomy.  He made a name for himself in the astronomy community by giving lectures at the age of 15.


Even though Carl Sagan, a faculty member at Cornell at the time, contacted Dr. Tyson to make a pitch for his attendance at Cornell, Neil chose Harvard University instead.  There, he majored in Physics, was a member of the crew team as a Freshman and lettered in wrestling in his Senior year.  After receiving his B.A., Dr. Tyson went on to attend the University of Texas at Austin were he won a gold medal along with the dance team, in the International Latin Ballroom style.  He began a doctoral program but transferred to Columbia University where he earned a PhD in Astrophysics.


As director of the Hayden Planetarium, Dr. Tyson has removed Pluto from its place as the ninth planet in our solar system.  He made the controversial decision to change Pluto's classification to “dwarf planet.”  Hate mail ensued but his assessment was upheld by the I.A.U.  The reasoning is that terrestrial objects should be grouped together; gas giants together and Pluto with other like objects.


The author of several popular astronomy books, Tyson has also written for Natural History magazine, a column titled “Universe.”  He has also held a Presidential appointment on the Commission on the Future of the United States Aerospace Industry and on the Presidential Commission on Implementation of US Exploration Policy (also known as the Moon Mars and Beyond Commission).  He also received the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal.


Dr. Tyson's ability to communicate his passion for astronomy is not confined to writing.  He has also hosted the PBS miniseries Nova and has appeared regularly on the series The Universe, which can be seen on the History Channel.  There have also been numerous media appearances on The Colbert Report, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, Late Night with Conan O'Brien, NPR and CNN.


Dr. Tyson lives in New York City with his wife and two children.

 
So, the next time you look up at the stars, think of Neil deGrasse Tyson and know that no dream is out of reach no matter how far away it may seem.

 

 

Also Check Out:

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Henrietta Lacks - Giving Life Through HeLa Cells

Charles Hamilton Houston - Civil Rights Attorney

Lt. Colonel Allen Allensworth - Slavery to Service 

The Story Behind Black History Month

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