Singer/Songwriter, Destiny ‘Adia’ Andrews was born in St Louis, Missouri but I’d say she hailed from Huntsville, Alabama. She calls herself a mutt when trying to describe exactly where she’s from, as she grew up all over. But “Huntsville is home” she insists. That’s where all her close relatives and her late grandmother – the most important piece to her puzzle—were from. Admittedly, She should probably come with a warning sign, one that reads “slow down, no assumptions just yet!” If you don’t know, Adia is a Gospel singer but not the average.


Following both the somewhat lackluster albums, No Mercy and Trouble Man, T.I. returns with Paperwork, a 15 track project that is essentially the second in a trilogy of albums from the Atlanta emcee - the first being Paper Trail, released in 2008. There are high moments and low points on Paperwork that ultimately allow for T.I. to showcase that he deserves to remain among some of the greats. Paperwork is intricate to the point where there is a sense that there were different personas at play in the studio. Pharrell executive produced the album, and that is a characteristic he has displayed in his previous trips in that role.


A ‘talented triple-threat that no one saw coming’ is the best way to describe new artist, Luke Christopher. With a collection of mixtapes floating around, Christopher has gained a fan base of followers calling themselves #TMRWGANG. He keeps them engaged by releasing a new song every Tuesday on his SoundCloud and #TMRWGANGTUESDAYS has already received over 2 million plays. His latest mixtape TMRW TMRW Pt. 2 can also be found on SoundCloud featuring contributions from Asher Roth, Baily, Shlohmo and Banks to name a few.


The Game has been a mainstay in the world of Hip-Hop since his emergence in 2005. His consistency is commendable. While there may be many varying opinions about the way he goes about handling his business, from his use of name drops to the high number of guests on his albums, it's still undeniable that more often than not Game goes off on a rap and delivers some of the best stuff out. On Blood Moon: Year of the Wolf, Game does something different from his norm, this time aiming to spotlight his own crew Blood Money Entertainment.


Point of No Return
is the sixth album from Keyshia Cole and amidst 11 tracks, she lets loose. It is steeped in expressive candor. The Keyshia featured here is frank, direct and pulling no punches.


Everything that entertains you isn't meant for pure entertainment. Kill The Messenger a new film by director, Michael Cuesta tells the story of journalist Gary Webb. He's a good natured man, a hard worker and a family man. Like any other man he's made some mistakes but his best days are ahead of him. Webb works for a small market daily publication in San Jose called the Mercury News, but he has aspirations of being more and doing more.

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Every week there is a new bunch of freestyles.  But seems there is no one reviewing them.  So introducing... 

Freestyle of the Week reviews

The best Riff Raff cuts juxtapose his absurd lyricism with a sense of sybaritic danger; think the slow-burn smolder of "Bird on a Wire." To that end, Kirko Bangz's "Shirts By Versace" seemed destined for Jody Highroller appropriation, with a dreggy sound that snakes and sparkles like a Caraquenian disco ball.

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: Riff Raff, "Shirts By Versace Freestyle"

Left recently on the killing floor of a mid-size Southern newspaper's editorial abattoir was a particular description of Chicago native Chance the Rapper's vocal stylings which I felt to be particularly apt: that he takes to the beats like a coursed hare.

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: Chance The Rapper, Sway in the Morning Freestyle

Despite abutting, as it does, a review/essay--predominantly essay--on Rick Ross' freestyle treatment of the very same song, one would not expect to find much in the Game's rendition, by way of comparative analysis. This is because, for most of his career, Game has occupied roughly the same end of the Voice-Skill spectrum as Rozay, hovering comfortably closer to the former rather than the latter.

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: The Game, "Bitch Don't Kill My Vibe Freestyle"

To fulfill the titular obligations of this column, let us address Rick Ross' freestyle upon Kendrick Lamar's "Bitch, Don't Kill My Vibe":

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: Rick Ross, "Don't Kill My Vibe"

The most striking imagery from Drake's "Started From The Bottom" visuals--edging out a bevy of comely, Isis eyelinered women and a preponderance of ridiculous dances, including a spiraling, hand spinning, maple-leaf-in-an-updraft maneuver and a high stepping, elbow locked march suspended above Toronto in front of a black and gold, owl emblazoned billboard--comes early; Drake and a topless Bentley, white as a blank page, white fur, white pants, white shoes, white shirt, gleaming silver jewelry, creeping along the road in a manmade cacophony of too perfect snow, moving fast while the skeletal branches in the background remain still.

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: Spenzo, "Started From The Bottom Freestyle"

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