Ever wonder what people in densely populated areas and non culturally diverse suburbs tuly think about minorities? On its surface the newly released film, The Suspect looks at just that. It goes much deeper though on a journey of suspense for a tangled web since the viewer is kept in the dark about several facts throughout the film. WIth a run time of just 98 minutes the viewer gets a lot in a short time and thefilm doesn't feel rushed at all, in fact it plays itself out at seemingly just the right pace.


“Spare the rod, spoil the child.” “It takes a village to raise a child.” These are quotes that we are all familiar with by now. However, does Facebook count as the “village” needed to raise children or is there a new trend that is getting out of hand? For the past couple of years, there has been a growing popularity of videos showing parents disciplining their children in front of a camera and posting them Facebook. While some videos feature a parent disciplining a child on camera to post on the child's Facebook page as punishment for misbehavior on the site, others have simply posted videos of them punishing their child on their own pages. So is posting videos of a child's punishment on social media a necessary part of the discipline, or does it go overboard? A Michigan mother and 2 others are probably asking themselves that question while they are behind bars.


Recently, I presented at the 15th annual Fathers and Family Coalition of America conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. My presentation focused on how fathering practitioners can use their life experience as a springboard to reach and teach fathers about the importance of their role as fathers. During my presentation one of the young fathers asked a very courageous question. Like many single fathers, he gets his son every other weekend and he questioned the significance of his time with his son. He stated that when he picks up his son on Fridays, before you know it the weekend is over and now he has to wait 12 days to see him again. He wanted to know what he could do to maintain his relevance.


Ever since Olivia Pope came on the scene a couple of years ago she has dominated the social media news feeds of Urban America.  She has elements of many women we all know and it's great having a familiar face on television to look to.  When Mary Jane Paul emerged on the scene a year or so ago, things got real.  Now that Being Mary Jane is a full season in, and with Scandal three seasons in, we figured it was time to look at the women that are these characters.  Given the chance who would you choose to date, to be a friend to?  Who could you actually stand to be around?


The latest Jason Derulo album, Talk Dirty, is chock full of party anthems and “get hype” tracks. The album starts off with Jason’s new smash hit, "Talk Dirty" (featuring 2 Chainz), which has spent the last sixteen weeks near the top of Billboard’s “The Hot 100” and currently sits at number four. Derulo has brought in many other popular Hip-Hop artists to collaborate on this record, including Snoop Dogg, TYGA, Kid Ink, and Pitbull. 


There was a huge debate recently about the Mt. Rushmore of the NBA.  Choosing the four greatest players to have ever played the sport of basketball proved to be quite the challenge and there is still no clear and decisive agreement on just four. The Mt. Rushmore of Hip-Hop may prove to be just as difficult, but we figured we'd give it a try and see what the readers think.


 
 

 

 

Every week there is a new bunch of freestyles.  But seems there is no one reviewing them.  So introducing... 

Freestyle of the Week reviews

The best Riff Raff cuts juxtapose his absurd lyricism with a sense of sybaritic danger; think the slow-burn smolder of "Bird on a Wire." To that end, Kirko Bangz's "Shirts By Versace" seemed destined for Jody Highroller appropriation, with a dreggy sound that snakes and sparkles like a Caraquenian disco ball.

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: Riff Raff, "Shirts By Versace Freestyle"

Left recently on the killing floor of a mid-size Southern newspaper's editorial abattoir was a particular description of Chicago native Chance the Rapper's vocal stylings which I felt to be particularly apt: that he takes to the beats like a coursed hare.

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: Chance The Rapper, Sway in the Morning Freestyle

Despite abutting, as it does, a review/essay--predominantly essay--on Rick Ross' freestyle treatment of the very same song, one would not expect to find much in the Game's rendition, by way of comparative analysis. This is because, for most of his career, Game has occupied roughly the same end of the Voice-Skill spectrum as Rozay, hovering comfortably closer to the former rather than the latter.

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: The Game, "Bitch Don't Kill My Vibe Freestyle"

To fulfill the titular obligations of this column, let us address Rick Ross' freestyle upon Kendrick Lamar's "Bitch, Don't Kill My Vibe":

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: Rick Ross, "Don't Kill My Vibe"

The most striking imagery from Drake's "Started From The Bottom" visuals--edging out a bevy of comely, Isis eyelinered women and a preponderance of ridiculous dances, including a spiraling, hand spinning, maple-leaf-in-an-updraft maneuver and a high stepping, elbow locked march suspended above Toronto in front of a black and gold, owl emblazoned billboard--comes early; Drake and a topless Bentley, white as a blank page, white fur, white pants, white shoes, white shirt, gleaming silver jewelry, creeping along the road in a manmade cacophony of too perfect snow, moving fast while the skeletal branches in the background remain still.

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: Spenzo, "Started From The Bottom Freestyle"

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