Being born in the 90’s certainly touched the new up and coming triple-threat artist Jo’zzy aka @dopebyaccident in a special way. She’s the protégé’ of super producer Timbaland and a talented singer/songwriter/rapper. Not only is the 90’s an inspiration and influence, but a way of life for this 24 year old; whose real name is Jocelyn Donald. She says of new single “Tryna Wife”, “It’s just nostalgic music and only the beginning. Some of today’s R&B and Hip-Hop can be so watered down and cookie-cutter, but my style of music makes you think of the 90’s.”


"They only get to see a certain part of your life and it’s not even fifty percent. It may be about fifteen percent of your life that these people are getting to watch so that’s never a good thing because you become this fifteen percent of what people get to see and there’s way more to most of us that are on that show..."  ~Bambi


“One thing I feel that happens a lot on the urban side of music, not as much on the mainstream pop side of music is that if artists don't come out for a few years, we forget that we loved them. This was not just some song I liked, but this was my favorite group in the world. I feel like the urban audience, we don't hold our stars up like the pop audience do. Their stars will put out an album tomorrow and it will still be double, triple, quadruple platinum…”  
~Brandon Casey of Jagged Edge 


Are you a fan of good 90’s music? A fan of music that allows you to still leave something to the imagination? Then you might want to cop that new Hi-Five The EP. Yes, that’s right—Billy, Faruq, Marcus, Shannon and Treston aka Hi-5 are making a comeback and Billy Covington and Faruq Evans assured Parlé Magazine in a recent interview, that they’re here to stay!


You've probably been a fan of Rico Love for years and didn't even know it. He has penned and produced chart topping hits for Usher, Keri Hilson, Fantasia, Chris Brown and Beyoncé to name a few. His EP, Discrete Luxury, was released late in 2013 and includes six new tracks including hit singles "They Don't Know" and "B*tches be Like." The EP serves as the prelude this debut album, Turn the Lights On, which is also the singer/songwriter’s memorable catch phrase. While Rico has made a name for himself mostly behind the scenes, the new record is his chance to not only expand his repertoire but show and prove that he has what it takes as a solo artist.


Kareem Nelson, didn’t tell the typical childhood story I expected to hear in a recent interview with the Wheelchairs Against Guns (W.A.G.) founder. He described a great childhood, a mother that provided everything he wanted and needed, if not more. As an only child, he said he had the best of everything, but the “streets” were still calling. “I chose the streets,” Nelson admitted. There was a sense of brotherhood and freedom that led him to the lifestyle that so many of our young Black men follow. Fast money, cars and women is the name of the game and where so many get caught up. For twelve years Nelson was about that life, until one night everything changed.


 
 

 

 

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Every week there is a new bunch of freestyles.  But seems there is no one reviewing them.  So introducing... 

Freestyle of the Week reviews

The best Riff Raff cuts juxtapose his absurd lyricism with a sense of sybaritic danger; think the slow-burn smolder of "Bird on a Wire." To that end, Kirko Bangz's "Shirts By Versace" seemed destined for Jody Highroller appropriation, with a dreggy sound that snakes and sparkles like a Caraquenian disco ball.

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: Riff Raff, "Shirts By Versace Freestyle"

Left recently on the killing floor of a mid-size Southern newspaper's editorial abattoir was a particular description of Chicago native Chance the Rapper's vocal stylings which I felt to be particularly apt: that he takes to the beats like a coursed hare.

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: Chance The Rapper, Sway in the Morning Freestyle

Despite abutting, as it does, a review/essay--predominantly essay--on Rick Ross' freestyle treatment of the very same song, one would not expect to find much in the Game's rendition, by way of comparative analysis. This is because, for most of his career, Game has occupied roughly the same end of the Voice-Skill spectrum as Rozay, hovering comfortably closer to the former rather than the latter.

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: The Game, "Bitch Don't Kill My Vibe Freestyle"

To fulfill the titular obligations of this column, let us address Rick Ross' freestyle upon Kendrick Lamar's "Bitch, Don't Kill My Vibe":

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: Rick Ross, "Don't Kill My Vibe"

The most striking imagery from Drake's "Started From The Bottom" visuals--edging out a bevy of comely, Isis eyelinered women and a preponderance of ridiculous dances, including a spiraling, hand spinning, maple-leaf-in-an-updraft maneuver and a high stepping, elbow locked march suspended above Toronto in front of a black and gold, owl emblazoned billboard--comes early; Drake and a topless Bentley, white as a blank page, white fur, white pants, white shoes, white shirt, gleaming silver jewelry, creeping along the road in a manmade cacophony of too perfect snow, moving fast while the skeletal branches in the background remain still.

Read more: Freestyle of the Week Review: Spenzo, "Started From The Bottom Freestyle"

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