As soon as he became the first artist to be signed to J. Cole’s label Dreamville, Bas has had big shoes to fill. Born in Paris, France, Bas moved to Queens, New York, at the age of eight. Before Bas was particularly interested in music, older brother, now known as DJ Moma, did everything he could to introduce Bas to various musical styles, including the electronic influences of the European music scene, which, at the time, was quite different from the popular American music of the era.


Sagging pants and fouled mouth children…”N” this, “N” that…
Slow walks approaching the school building
Prep to take the belts off…
“Hurry…hurry” a friend yells out to hide their cell phones
Metal detectors…
“Empty your pockets”
beep…beep…
“Go!”
No ‘Good Mornings’
No smiles—


To be 100% honest with ya’ll, I almost fainted when I walked into the room where songtress, Leela James had been relaxing on the couch. I greeted everyone and introduced myself and like the cool and beautiful person Ms. James was she said, “Hey sweetie, you got to excuse me for laying down we been traveling all day, but you can lay down and relax with me.” Totally blown away by her “down-to-earth” approach, she was every thing I imagined her to be in person.


If you follow Kachelle Kelly on social media you’ll definitely discover her passion for what she does, she’s positive and she is about her BUSINESS. She can coach her clients from a dream to a reality of what they imagined their business to be with consistency and determination. She has even started a $39 a month program for ones who may be a bit financially tight but would love to ask her a question once a month. I follow her on Instagram and it seems as though she’s very well respected in the city of Houston. She has started a Boss Women Pray and Boss Men Pray movement. She not only have the books, but also shirts in which quite a few familiar faces happily wore for a recent photo shoot.

If you or someone you know is in need of guidance for business-you may want to think of Kachelle Kelly. Read the interview below to learn a little more.

Talent is all around us and with each passing year comes a new star in the making, one that is sure to set 2014 a blaze is R&B crooner Anthony Lewis. In February, the 17 year-old L.A. native released his single, “Candy Rain,” a remix of the 90’s classic from R&B group Soul 4 Real. He has since caught the eyes and ears of every major music and is making strides on Billboard's Hot 100 list. With the song in continuous rotation prompting live performances and more work on his forthcoming debut album to be done Anthony is busier than ever, fortunately he had a few moments to spare to talk about his growing career, his inspiration, and the future of his craft.  See what he had to say below.


New Yorkers know, just being here prepares you for everything the world has to offer. For entertainers that is true double time. Washington Heights bred, Dominican actress, Suveria Mota discovered acting was her passion in high school and she continued to pursue her dream through pursuing her degree at Lehman College in the Bronx. After she got her degree she made the move to Hollywood where things really began to take off. Now with a few roles under her belt and some soon to be released projects, Mota is a talent to look forward to. We got a chance to speak with the actress about what finding success is like for a Latina in Hollywood, the importance of education and what's next for her. Discover the next big name below.


 
 

 

 

I got genes, you got genes, all God's children got genes.  While this is true of each and every one of us, not many people will be able to say that their genes outlived them.  None of us will probably live to see modern medicine use cells from our body to aid in saving lives.  But, this is exactly what happened with cells taken from Henrietta Lacks also known as HeLa cells.
She was born Loretta Pleasant on August 1, 1920 in Roanoke, Virginia and raised in Clover, VA on a tobacco farm.  Lacks married her first cousin David Lacks and they became the parents of two children, with the first being born when Henrietta was only 14 years old.  Later, David and Henrietta moved to Dundalk in Baltimore County, MD so that David could work at the shipyards.  They lived in the community of Turners Station.
In February 1951, Henrietta visited Johns Hopkins University due to a painful "knot" in her cervix and bloody discharge.  A biopsy revealed cervical cancer.  The gynecologist Dr. Edward Jones, who along with his wife Georgeanna founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, found the tumor to be strange and different.  Without her knowledge, cells from the tumor were removed for research purposes.  Although treated with radium tube inserts, a common practice for treating these types of cancers, Lacks' condition worsened.  She was admitted into the hospital on August 8 and remained there until she died on October 4, 1951 at 31 years of age from uremic poisoning.
The cells from Henrietta's tumor, according to Dr. George Gey, were unlike any cells seen before.  These remarkable cells could be kept alive and grown.  In a lab, the cells were used to conduct experiments such as aiding in the development of the polio vaccine.  These experiments caused quite a frenzy in the medical community and became a source of revenue.  HeLa cells were mass produced and sent to scientists worldwide for research into cancer, AIDS, and other scientific endeavors.  Scientists still do not know exactly what makes HeLa cells so durable and quick to multiply.  In the 1970s researchers contacted the Lacks family members to obtain blood samples in order to study their genetics, but no one shared Henrietta's unique traits.
Although she died in 1951, Lacks has posthumously garnered some media attention and recognition including magazine and newspaper articles, books, an episode from a television series, and documentaries.  She was also bestowed with honors for her contributions to science by Morehouse College and the mayor of Atlanta, as well as an annual day of commemoration by the community and residents of Turners Station.  There was also a Congressional resolution presented by Robert Erlich.
Even in death Henrietta Lacks lives on through the 20 tons of HeLa cells collected and reproduced in the name of science.

I got genes, you got genes, all God's children got genes.  While this is true of each and every one of us, not many people will be able to say that their genes outlived them.  None of us will probably live to see modern medicine use cells from our body to aid in saving lives.  But, this is exactly what happened with cells taken from Henrietta Lacks also known as HeLa cells.

 

She was born Loretta Pleasant on August 1, 1920 in Roanoke, Virginia and raised in Clover, VA on a tobacco farm.  Lacks married her first cousin David Lacks and they became the parents of two children, with the first being born when Henrietta was only 14 years old.  Later, David and Henrietta moved to Dundalk in Baltimore County, MD so that David could work at the shipyards.  They lived in the community of Turners Station.


In February 1951, Henrietta visited Johns Hopkins University due to a painful "knot" in her cervix and bloody discharge.  A biopsy revealed cervical cancer.  The gynecologist Dr. Edward Jones, who along with his wife Georgeanna founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, found the tumor to be strange and different.  Without her knowledge, cells from the tumor were removed for research purposes.  Although treated with radium tube inserts, a common practice for treating these types of cancers, Lacks' condition worsened.  She was admitted into the hospital on August 8 and remained there until she died on October 4, 1951 at 31 years of age from uremic poisoning.


The cells from Henrietta's tumor, according to Dr. George Gey, were unlike any cells seen before.  These remarkable cells could be kept alive and grown.  In a lab, the cells were used to conduct experiments such as aiding in the development of the polio vaccine.  These experiments caused quite a frenzy in the medical community and became a source of revenue.  HeLa cells were mass produced and sent to scientists worldwide for research into cancer, AIDS, and other scientific endeavors.  Scientists still do not know exactly what makes HeLa cells so durable and quick to multiply.  In the 1970s researchers contacted the Lacks family members to obtain blood samples in order to study their genetics, but no one shared Henrietta's unique traits.


Although she died in 1951, Lacks has posthumously garnered some media attention and recognition including magazine and newspaper articles, books, an episode from a television series, and documentaries.  She was also bestowed with honors for her contributions to science by Morehouse College and the mayor of Atlanta, as well as an annual day of commemoration by the community and residents of Turners Station.  There was also a Congressional resolution presented by Robert Erlich.  
Even in death Henrietta Lacks lives on through the 20 tons of HeLa cells collected and reproduced in the name of science.

 

 

Also Check Out:

The Story Behind Black History Month

Phillis Wheatley - First Published African-American

Charles Hamilton Houston - Civil Rights Attorney

Althea Gibson - Early Black Dominance in Sports

Lt. Colonel Allen Allensworth - Slavery to Service 

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