Stepping out of the shadows of her ex-husbands’ success, Torrei Hart is hell bent on making a new name for herself. She’s much more than just Kevin Hart’s ex-wife, and she wants to make it clear. First and foremost, she’s a mother, but she is also an actress and she’s also passionate, spiritual, driven, straightforward and a mogul in the making.


The name Meesha Mink stands out in urban fiction like no other, simply because it speaks to the uniqueness and creativity of it's owner. After making her debut in 2008 with the well received, Desperate Hoodwives, Mink has continued to release page turning quality both as a co-author and with her individual works. Her latest book to make a mark on readers is Kiss The Ring, a modern day Foxy Brown type story, about a woman on a mission to avenge the death of her son. Released in August, it's the first book of her latest series and a dynamic read for lovers of all genres. We interviewed the author to discuss the series, the state of urban fiction and much more. Check it out here...


Telling anyone's story can be tricky because it can go wrong in a number of ways. From focusing on the wrong details or overlooking something that viewers were looking forward to. When the subject is someone like Jimi Hendrix, who few really knew, it gets that much more difficult. Though he is well regarded as one of the greatest guitarist ever, his career really only spanned 4 years. That gives you a specific time period to focus on, but it also demands that you show why he deserves all the acclaim in huge chunks.


Idris Elba and Taraji P. Henson star in No Good Deed, the tale of what happens when a criminal escapes from prison and finds his way into an unsuspecting woman's home. We've seen this story before but with a full African-American cast, and no Tyler Perry involvement, it feels like a fresh idea and a worthy watch. Plus the stars make for pretty great eye candy, which I think the production team knew would be good for the big screen.


I was first introduced to Jhené Aiko on Kendrick Lamar's "Growing Apart." Her voice is gentle and somewhat tinged with a sultriness that often encroaches on cutting aggression. Aiko understands where to emphasize her voice, wrapping it around the lyrics to achieve a hypnotic mix of hip hop and R&B. Souled Out, the debut from the singer is made up of mid-temp melodies that emerge as freestyles, rather than songs. This is not a bad thing because Aiko has stated that her process of recording music is one of letting it unfold rather than rushing.

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Originality is such a hard thing to come by these days that it’s no wonder you’ll see so many movies, TV shows and music that look and sound the same.
 When is the last time you heard a song or movie that you couldn’t compare to something else prior? Probably never. That doesn’t mean that originality or creativity has died, but just means that people have a brand new way of seeing things. One of the greatest movies of all times, Star Wars is often compared to Star Trek. They have forums of geeks and nerds sighting the familiarities between these two, I’ll save you the time and say that I’ve seen all the Star Wars series and none of the Star Trek franchise despite their many TV shows and spin-off movies but I'm aware of how they tend to overlap each other in some aspects.

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I got genes, you got genes, all God's children got genes.  While this is true of each and every one of us, not many people will be able to say that their genes outlived them.  None of us will probably live to see modern medicine use cells from our body to aid in saving lives.  But, this is exactly what happened with cells taken from Henrietta Lacks also known as HeLa cells.
She was born Loretta Pleasant on August 1, 1920 in Roanoke, Virginia and raised in Clover, VA on a tobacco farm.  Lacks married her first cousin David Lacks and they became the parents of two children, with the first being born when Henrietta was only 14 years old.  Later, David and Henrietta moved to Dundalk in Baltimore County, MD so that David could work at the shipyards.  They lived in the community of Turners Station.
In February 1951, Henrietta visited Johns Hopkins University due to a painful "knot" in her cervix and bloody discharge.  A biopsy revealed cervical cancer.  The gynecologist Dr. Edward Jones, who along with his wife Georgeanna founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, found the tumor to be strange and different.  Without her knowledge, cells from the tumor were removed for research purposes.  Although treated with radium tube inserts, a common practice for treating these types of cancers, Lacks' condition worsened.  She was admitted into the hospital on August 8 and remained there until she died on October 4, 1951 at 31 years of age from uremic poisoning.
The cells from Henrietta's tumor, according to Dr. George Gey, were unlike any cells seen before.  These remarkable cells could be kept alive and grown.  In a lab, the cells were used to conduct experiments such as aiding in the development of the polio vaccine.  These experiments caused quite a frenzy in the medical community and became a source of revenue.  HeLa cells were mass produced and sent to scientists worldwide for research into cancer, AIDS, and other scientific endeavors.  Scientists still do not know exactly what makes HeLa cells so durable and quick to multiply.  In the 1970s researchers contacted the Lacks family members to obtain blood samples in order to study their genetics, but no one shared Henrietta's unique traits.
Although she died in 1951, Lacks has posthumously garnered some media attention and recognition including magazine and newspaper articles, books, an episode from a television series, and documentaries.  She was also bestowed with honors for her contributions to science by Morehouse College and the mayor of Atlanta, as well as an annual day of commemoration by the community and residents of Turners Station.  There was also a Congressional resolution presented by Robert Erlich.
Even in death Henrietta Lacks lives on through the 20 tons of HeLa cells collected and reproduced in the name of science.

I got genes, you got genes, all God's children got genes.  While this is true of each and every one of us, not many people will be able to say that their genes outlived them.  None of us will probably live to see modern medicine use cells from our body to aid in saving lives.  But, this is exactly what happened with cells taken from Henrietta Lacks also known as HeLa cells.

 

She was born Loretta Pleasant on August 1, 1920 in Roanoke, Virginia and raised in Clover, VA on a tobacco farm.  Lacks married her first cousin David Lacks and they became the parents of two children, with the first being born when Henrietta was only 14 years old.  Later, David and Henrietta moved to Dundalk in Baltimore County, MD so that David could work at the shipyards.  They lived in the community of Turners Station.


In February 1951, Henrietta visited Johns Hopkins University due to a painful "knot" in her cervix and bloody discharge.  A biopsy revealed cervical cancer.  The gynecologist Dr. Edward Jones, who along with his wife Georgeanna founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, found the tumor to be strange and different.  Without her knowledge, cells from the tumor were removed for research purposes.  Although treated with radium tube inserts, a common practice for treating these types of cancers, Lacks' condition worsened.  She was admitted into the hospital on August 8 and remained there until she died on October 4, 1951 at 31 years of age from uremic poisoning.


The cells from Henrietta's tumor, according to Dr. George Gey, were unlike any cells seen before.  These remarkable cells could be kept alive and grown.  In a lab, the cells were used to conduct experiments such as aiding in the development of the polio vaccine.  These experiments caused quite a frenzy in the medical community and became a source of revenue.  HeLa cells were mass produced and sent to scientists worldwide for research into cancer, AIDS, and other scientific endeavors.  Scientists still do not know exactly what makes HeLa cells so durable and quick to multiply.  In the 1970s researchers contacted the Lacks family members to obtain blood samples in order to study their genetics, but no one shared Henrietta's unique traits.


Although she died in 1951, Lacks has posthumously garnered some media attention and recognition including magazine and newspaper articles, books, an episode from a television series, and documentaries.  She was also bestowed with honors for her contributions to science by Morehouse College and the mayor of Atlanta, as well as an annual day of commemoration by the community and residents of Turners Station.  There was also a Congressional resolution presented by Robert Erlich.  
Even in death Henrietta Lacks lives on through the 20 tons of HeLa cells collected and reproduced in the name of science.

 

 

Also Check Out:

The Story Behind Black History Month

Phillis Wheatley - First Published African-American

Charles Hamilton Houston - Civil Rights Attorney

Althea Gibson - Early Black Dominance in Sports

Lt. Colonel Allen Allensworth - Slavery to Service 

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