Syleena Johnson is one of the bonafide soul singers of our generation and a true R&B Diva that has maintained a penchant for great music since the late 90s. Her musical diary in the form of her Chapter releases have been stacked with hit songs since the original Chapter 1: Love, Pain & Forgiveness was released in 2001. Now with a new label, Blakbyrd Music, Syleena releases her sixth installment of the series, the true to life Chapter 6: Couple's Therapy. While she has grown in her years and through her experiences, the quality of music remains grand. An overall review just wouldn't do here, so we decided to deliver a track by track review of Syleena Johnson's Couple's Therapy.


Singer/Songwriter, Destiny ‘Adia’ Andrews was born in St Louis, Missouri but I’d say she hailed from Huntsville, Alabama. She calls herself a mutt when trying to describe exactly where she’s from, as she grew up all over. But “Huntsville is home” she insists. That’s where all her close relatives and her late grandmother – the most important piece to her puzzle—were from. Admittedly, She should probably come with a warning sign, one that reads “slow down, no assumptions just yet!” If you don’t know, Adia is a Gospel singer but not the average.


Following both the somewhat lackluster albums, No Mercy and Trouble Man, T.I. returns with Paperwork, a 15 track project that is essentially the second in a trilogy of albums from the Atlanta emcee - the first being Paper Trail, released in 2008. There are high moments and low points on Paperwork that ultimately allow for T.I. to showcase that he deserves to remain among some of the greats. Paperwork is intricate to the point where there is a sense that there were different personas at play in the studio. Pharrell executive produced the album, and that is a characteristic he has displayed in his previous trips in that role.


A ‘talented triple-threat that no one saw coming’ is the best way to describe new artist, Luke Christopher. With a collection of mixtapes floating around, Christopher has gained a fan base of followers calling themselves #TMRWGANG. He keeps them engaged by releasing a new song every Tuesday on his SoundCloud and #TMRWGANGTUESDAYS has already received over 2 million plays. His latest mixtape TMRW TMRW Pt. 2 can also be found on SoundCloud featuring contributions from Asher Roth, Baily, Shlohmo and Banks to name a few.


The Game has been a mainstay in the world of Hip-Hop since his emergence in 2005. His consistency is commendable. While there may be many varying opinions about the way he goes about handling his business, from his use of name drops to the high number of guests on his albums, it's still undeniable that more often than not Game goes off on a rap and delivers some of the best stuff out. On Blood Moon: Year of the Wolf, Game does something different from his norm, this time aiming to spotlight his own crew Blood Money Entertainment.


Point of No Return
is the sixth album from Keyshia Cole and amidst 11 tracks, she lets loose. It is steeped in expressive candor. The Keyshia featured here is frank, direct and pulling no punches.

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I got genes, you got genes, all God's children got genes.  While this is true of each and every one of us, not many people will be able to say that their genes outlived them.  None of us will probably live to see modern medicine use cells from our body to aid in saving lives.  But, this is exactly what happened with cells taken from Henrietta Lacks also known as HeLa cells.
She was born Loretta Pleasant on August 1, 1920 in Roanoke, Virginia and raised in Clover, VA on a tobacco farm.  Lacks married her first cousin David Lacks and they became the parents of two children, with the first being born when Henrietta was only 14 years old.  Later, David and Henrietta moved to Dundalk in Baltimore County, MD so that David could work at the shipyards.  They lived in the community of Turners Station.
In February 1951, Henrietta visited Johns Hopkins University due to a painful "knot" in her cervix and bloody discharge.  A biopsy revealed cervical cancer.  The gynecologist Dr. Edward Jones, who along with his wife Georgeanna founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, found the tumor to be strange and different.  Without her knowledge, cells from the tumor were removed for research purposes.  Although treated with radium tube inserts, a common practice for treating these types of cancers, Lacks' condition worsened.  She was admitted into the hospital on August 8 and remained there until she died on October 4, 1951 at 31 years of age from uremic poisoning.
The cells from Henrietta's tumor, according to Dr. George Gey, were unlike any cells seen before.  These remarkable cells could be kept alive and grown.  In a lab, the cells were used to conduct experiments such as aiding in the development of the polio vaccine.  These experiments caused quite a frenzy in the medical community and became a source of revenue.  HeLa cells were mass produced and sent to scientists worldwide for research into cancer, AIDS, and other scientific endeavors.  Scientists still do not know exactly what makes HeLa cells so durable and quick to multiply.  In the 1970s researchers contacted the Lacks family members to obtain blood samples in order to study their genetics, but no one shared Henrietta's unique traits.
Although she died in 1951, Lacks has posthumously garnered some media attention and recognition including magazine and newspaper articles, books, an episode from a television series, and documentaries.  She was also bestowed with honors for her contributions to science by Morehouse College and the mayor of Atlanta, as well as an annual day of commemoration by the community and residents of Turners Station.  There was also a Congressional resolution presented by Robert Erlich.
Even in death Henrietta Lacks lives on through the 20 tons of HeLa cells collected and reproduced in the name of science.

I got genes, you got genes, all God's children got genes.  While this is true of each and every one of us, not many people will be able to say that their genes outlived them.  None of us will probably live to see modern medicine use cells from our body to aid in saving lives.  But, this is exactly what happened with cells taken from Henrietta Lacks also known as HeLa cells.

 

She was born Loretta Pleasant on August 1, 1920 in Roanoke, Virginia and raised in Clover, VA on a tobacco farm.  Lacks married her first cousin David Lacks and they became the parents of two children, with the first being born when Henrietta was only 14 years old.  Later, David and Henrietta moved to Dundalk in Baltimore County, MD so that David could work at the shipyards.  They lived in the community of Turners Station.


In February 1951, Henrietta visited Johns Hopkins University due to a painful "knot" in her cervix and bloody discharge.  A biopsy revealed cervical cancer.  The gynecologist Dr. Edward Jones, who along with his wife Georgeanna founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, found the tumor to be strange and different.  Without her knowledge, cells from the tumor were removed for research purposes.  Although treated with radium tube inserts, a common practice for treating these types of cancers, Lacks' condition worsened.  She was admitted into the hospital on August 8 and remained there until she died on October 4, 1951 at 31 years of age from uremic poisoning.


The cells from Henrietta's tumor, according to Dr. George Gey, were unlike any cells seen before.  These remarkable cells could be kept alive and grown.  In a lab, the cells were used to conduct experiments such as aiding in the development of the polio vaccine.  These experiments caused quite a frenzy in the medical community and became a source of revenue.  HeLa cells were mass produced and sent to scientists worldwide for research into cancer, AIDS, and other scientific endeavors.  Scientists still do not know exactly what makes HeLa cells so durable and quick to multiply.  In the 1970s researchers contacted the Lacks family members to obtain blood samples in order to study their genetics, but no one shared Henrietta's unique traits.


Although she died in 1951, Lacks has posthumously garnered some media attention and recognition including magazine and newspaper articles, books, an episode from a television series, and documentaries.  She was also bestowed with honors for her contributions to science by Morehouse College and the mayor of Atlanta, as well as an annual day of commemoration by the community and residents of Turners Station.  There was also a Congressional resolution presented by Robert Erlich.  
Even in death Henrietta Lacks lives on through the 20 tons of HeLa cells collected and reproduced in the name of science.

 

 

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Phillis Wheatley - First Published African-American

Charles Hamilton Houston - Civil Rights Attorney

Althea Gibson - Early Black Dominance in Sports

Lt. Colonel Allen Allensworth - Slavery to Service 

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