Being born in the 90’s certainly touched the new up and coming triple-threat artist Jo’zzy aka @dopebyaccident in a special way. She’s the protégé’ of super producer Timbaland and a talented singer/songwriter/rapper. Not only is the 90’s an inspiration and influence, but a way of life for this 24 year old; whose real name is Jocelyn Donald. She says of new single “Tryna Wife”, “It’s just nostalgic music and only the beginning. Some of today’s R&B and Hip-Hop can be so watered down and cookie-cutter, but my style of music makes you think of the 90’s.”


"They only get to see a certain part of your life and it’s not even fifty percent. It may be about fifteen percent of your life that these people are getting to watch so that’s never a good thing because you become this fifteen percent of what people get to see and there’s way more to most of us that are on that show..."  ~Bambi


“One thing I feel that happens a lot on the urban side of music, not as much on the mainstream pop side of music is that if artists don't come out for a few years, we forget that we loved them. This was not just some song I liked, but this was my favorite group in the world. I feel like the urban audience, we don't hold our stars up like the pop audience do. Their stars will put out an album tomorrow and it will still be double, triple, quadruple platinum…”  
~Brandon Casey of Jagged Edge 


Are you a fan of good 90’s music? A fan of music that allows you to still leave something to the imagination? Then you might want to cop that new Hi-Five The EP. Yes, that’s right—Billy, Faruq, Marcus, Shannon and Treston aka Hi-5 are making a comeback and Billy Covington and Faruq Evans assured Parlé Magazine in a recent interview, that they’re here to stay!


You've probably been a fan of Rico Love for years and didn't even know it. He has penned and produced chart topping hits for Usher, Keri Hilson, Fantasia, Chris Brown and Beyoncé to name a few. His EP, Discrete Luxury, was released late in 2013 and includes six new tracks including hit singles "They Don't Know" and "B*tches be Like." The EP serves as the prelude this debut album, Turn the Lights On, which is also the singer/songwriter’s memorable catch phrase. While Rico has made a name for himself mostly behind the scenes, the new record is his chance to not only expand his repertoire but show and prove that he has what it takes as a solo artist.


Kareem Nelson, didn’t tell the typical childhood story I expected to hear in a recent interview with the Wheelchairs Against Guns (W.A.G.) founder. He described a great childhood, a mother that provided everything he wanted and needed, if not more. As an only child, he said he had the best of everything, but the “streets” were still calling. “I chose the streets,” Nelson admitted. There was a sense of brotherhood and freedom that led him to the lifestyle that so many of our young Black men follow. Fast money, cars and women is the name of the game and where so many get caught up. For twelve years Nelson was about that life, until one night everything changed.


 
 

 

 

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I got genes, you got genes, all God's children got genes.  While this is true of each and every one of us, not many people will be able to say that their genes outlived them.  None of us will probably live to see modern medicine use cells from our body to aid in saving lives.  But, this is exactly what happened with cells taken from Henrietta Lacks also known as HeLa cells.
She was born Loretta Pleasant on August 1, 1920 in Roanoke, Virginia and raised in Clover, VA on a tobacco farm.  Lacks married her first cousin David Lacks and they became the parents of two children, with the first being born when Henrietta was only 14 years old.  Later, David and Henrietta moved to Dundalk in Baltimore County, MD so that David could work at the shipyards.  They lived in the community of Turners Station.
In February 1951, Henrietta visited Johns Hopkins University due to a painful "knot" in her cervix and bloody discharge.  A biopsy revealed cervical cancer.  The gynecologist Dr. Edward Jones, who along with his wife Georgeanna founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, found the tumor to be strange and different.  Without her knowledge, cells from the tumor were removed for research purposes.  Although treated with radium tube inserts, a common practice for treating these types of cancers, Lacks' condition worsened.  She was admitted into the hospital on August 8 and remained there until she died on October 4, 1951 at 31 years of age from uremic poisoning.
The cells from Henrietta's tumor, according to Dr. George Gey, were unlike any cells seen before.  These remarkable cells could be kept alive and grown.  In a lab, the cells were used to conduct experiments such as aiding in the development of the polio vaccine.  These experiments caused quite a frenzy in the medical community and became a source of revenue.  HeLa cells were mass produced and sent to scientists worldwide for research into cancer, AIDS, and other scientific endeavors.  Scientists still do not know exactly what makes HeLa cells so durable and quick to multiply.  In the 1970s researchers contacted the Lacks family members to obtain blood samples in order to study their genetics, but no one shared Henrietta's unique traits.
Although she died in 1951, Lacks has posthumously garnered some media attention and recognition including magazine and newspaper articles, books, an episode from a television series, and documentaries.  She was also bestowed with honors for her contributions to science by Morehouse College and the mayor of Atlanta, as well as an annual day of commemoration by the community and residents of Turners Station.  There was also a Congressional resolution presented by Robert Erlich.
Even in death Henrietta Lacks lives on through the 20 tons of HeLa cells collected and reproduced in the name of science.

I got genes, you got genes, all God's children got genes.  While this is true of each and every one of us, not many people will be able to say that their genes outlived them.  None of us will probably live to see modern medicine use cells from our body to aid in saving lives.  But, this is exactly what happened with cells taken from Henrietta Lacks also known as HeLa cells.

 

She was born Loretta Pleasant on August 1, 1920 in Roanoke, Virginia and raised in Clover, VA on a tobacco farm.  Lacks married her first cousin David Lacks and they became the parents of two children, with the first being born when Henrietta was only 14 years old.  Later, David and Henrietta moved to Dundalk in Baltimore County, MD so that David could work at the shipyards.  They lived in the community of Turners Station.


In February 1951, Henrietta visited Johns Hopkins University due to a painful "knot" in her cervix and bloody discharge.  A biopsy revealed cervical cancer.  The gynecologist Dr. Edward Jones, who along with his wife Georgeanna founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, found the tumor to be strange and different.  Without her knowledge, cells from the tumor were removed for research purposes.  Although treated with radium tube inserts, a common practice for treating these types of cancers, Lacks' condition worsened.  She was admitted into the hospital on August 8 and remained there until she died on October 4, 1951 at 31 years of age from uremic poisoning.


The cells from Henrietta's tumor, according to Dr. George Gey, were unlike any cells seen before.  These remarkable cells could be kept alive and grown.  In a lab, the cells were used to conduct experiments such as aiding in the development of the polio vaccine.  These experiments caused quite a frenzy in the medical community and became a source of revenue.  HeLa cells were mass produced and sent to scientists worldwide for research into cancer, AIDS, and other scientific endeavors.  Scientists still do not know exactly what makes HeLa cells so durable and quick to multiply.  In the 1970s researchers contacted the Lacks family members to obtain blood samples in order to study their genetics, but no one shared Henrietta's unique traits.


Although she died in 1951, Lacks has posthumously garnered some media attention and recognition including magazine and newspaper articles, books, an episode from a television series, and documentaries.  She was also bestowed with honors for her contributions to science by Morehouse College and the mayor of Atlanta, as well as an annual day of commemoration by the community and residents of Turners Station.  There was also a Congressional resolution presented by Robert Erlich.  
Even in death Henrietta Lacks lives on through the 20 tons of HeLa cells collected and reproduced in the name of science.

 

 

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