Ever since Olivia Pope came on the scene a couple of years ago she has dominated the social media news feeds of Urban America.  She has elements of many women we all know and it's great having a familiar face on television to look to.  When Mary Jane Paul emerged on the scene a year or so ago, things got real.  Now that Being Mary Jane is a full season in, and with Scandal three seasons in, we figured it was time to look at the women that are these characters.  Given the chance who would you choose to date, to be a friend to?  Who could you actually stand to be around?


The latest Jason Derulo album, Talk Dirty, is chock full of party anthems and “get hype” tracks. The album starts off with Jason’s new smash hit, "Talk Dirty" (featuring 2 Chainz), which has spent the last sixteen weeks near the top of Billboard’s “The Hot 100” and currently sits at number four. Derulo has brought in many other popular Hip-Hop artists to collaborate on this record, including Snoop Dogg, TYGA, Kid Ink, and Pitbull. 


There was a huge debate recently about the Mt. Rushmore of the NBA.  Choosing the four greatest players to have ever played the sport of basketball proved to be quite the challenge and there is still no clear and decisive agreement on just four. The Mt. Rushmore of Hip-Hop may prove to be just as difficult, but we figured we'd give it a try and see what the readers think.


It’s a Marlon Wayne’s movie what do want me to say? It was bleeping hilarious. Literally as soon as the movie started the theatre was roaring in laughter and I’m not even exaggerating. The opening scene was arguably the most funny (actually during the Q&A after the screening an audience member said it was his favorite part). Co-star Affion Crokett is one of the first characters you’re reintroduced to and he had my stomach hurting early. I’m going to just say that I would’ve liked to see more of him in the film. Hey, Marlon told us to be honest in our critiques. With that said though, the film still surpassed the expectations of a sequel. 


Who would have ever thought a shy girl from Beaufort, South Carolina would be American Idol's Season 12 winner. She's grown a lot since only being able to sing for her parents. Life has changed for Candice Glover. Her Season 12 win is actually her third attempt at auditioning for American Idol. She's proven that she believes in herself. It was nothing short of courage to be able to face many at a third shot on the show to prove that she had what it took to take home the crown, even if she didn't know for sure herself at the time. She's motivated so many to go after what they want and to never give up. WIth the recent release of her debut album, Music Speaks, and her single, "Cried," Glover continues to motivate women everywhere.  Read the full interview to get Candice Glover a little better...


Drew 32, writer, producer, videographer—you name it he has done it. His hands on approach to his brand of music is admirable. From the D to the world, with stops along the way as an opening act for Gym Class Heroes, Kendrick Lamar, and the New Boyz hasn't hurt. His performances at Sundance Film Festival and SXSW Music Conference have done wonders for his buzz, and odds are his production going forward will be just as stellar. Drew32 Recently released The Batch, an ode to his fans, and a teaser for what 2014 and beyond hold.  Judging by the attention his hit single “I Am King,” is getting along with his mantra, 'the more content, the better,' the future is very bright for this Greek-American artist.  Parlé with me as I introduce to you… Drew 32.


 
 

 

 

I got genes, you got genes, all God's children got genes.  While this is true of each and every one of us, not many people will be able to say that their genes outlived them.  None of us will probably live to see modern medicine use cells from our body to aid in saving lives.  But, this is exactly what happened with cells taken from Henrietta Lacks also known as HeLa cells.
She was born Loretta Pleasant on August 1, 1920 in Roanoke, Virginia and raised in Clover, VA on a tobacco farm.  Lacks married her first cousin David Lacks and they became the parents of two children, with the first being born when Henrietta was only 14 years old.  Later, David and Henrietta moved to Dundalk in Baltimore County, MD so that David could work at the shipyards.  They lived in the community of Turners Station.
In February 1951, Henrietta visited Johns Hopkins University due to a painful "knot" in her cervix and bloody discharge.  A biopsy revealed cervical cancer.  The gynecologist Dr. Edward Jones, who along with his wife Georgeanna founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, found the tumor to be strange and different.  Without her knowledge, cells from the tumor were removed for research purposes.  Although treated with radium tube inserts, a common practice for treating these types of cancers, Lacks' condition worsened.  She was admitted into the hospital on August 8 and remained there until she died on October 4, 1951 at 31 years of age from uremic poisoning.
The cells from Henrietta's tumor, according to Dr. George Gey, were unlike any cells seen before.  These remarkable cells could be kept alive and grown.  In a lab, the cells were used to conduct experiments such as aiding in the development of the polio vaccine.  These experiments caused quite a frenzy in the medical community and became a source of revenue.  HeLa cells were mass produced and sent to scientists worldwide for research into cancer, AIDS, and other scientific endeavors.  Scientists still do not know exactly what makes HeLa cells so durable and quick to multiply.  In the 1970s researchers contacted the Lacks family members to obtain blood samples in order to study their genetics, but no one shared Henrietta's unique traits.
Although she died in 1951, Lacks has posthumously garnered some media attention and recognition including magazine and newspaper articles, books, an episode from a television series, and documentaries.  She was also bestowed with honors for her contributions to science by Morehouse College and the mayor of Atlanta, as well as an annual day of commemoration by the community and residents of Turners Station.  There was also a Congressional resolution presented by Robert Erlich.
Even in death Henrietta Lacks lives on through the 20 tons of HeLa cells collected and reproduced in the name of science.

I got genes, you got genes, all God's children got genes.  While this is true of each and every one of us, not many people will be able to say that their genes outlived them.  None of us will probably live to see modern medicine use cells from our body to aid in saving lives.  But, this is exactly what happened with cells taken from Henrietta Lacks also known as HeLa cells.

 

She was born Loretta Pleasant on August 1, 1920 in Roanoke, Virginia and raised in Clover, VA on a tobacco farm.  Lacks married her first cousin David Lacks and they became the parents of two children, with the first being born when Henrietta was only 14 years old.  Later, David and Henrietta moved to Dundalk in Baltimore County, MD so that David could work at the shipyards.  They lived in the community of Turners Station.


In February 1951, Henrietta visited Johns Hopkins University due to a painful "knot" in her cervix and bloody discharge.  A biopsy revealed cervical cancer.  The gynecologist Dr. Edward Jones, who along with his wife Georgeanna founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, found the tumor to be strange and different.  Without her knowledge, cells from the tumor were removed for research purposes.  Although treated with radium tube inserts, a common practice for treating these types of cancers, Lacks' condition worsened.  She was admitted into the hospital on August 8 and remained there until she died on October 4, 1951 at 31 years of age from uremic poisoning.


The cells from Henrietta's tumor, according to Dr. George Gey, were unlike any cells seen before.  These remarkable cells could be kept alive and grown.  In a lab, the cells were used to conduct experiments such as aiding in the development of the polio vaccine.  These experiments caused quite a frenzy in the medical community and became a source of revenue.  HeLa cells were mass produced and sent to scientists worldwide for research into cancer, AIDS, and other scientific endeavors.  Scientists still do not know exactly what makes HeLa cells so durable and quick to multiply.  In the 1970s researchers contacted the Lacks family members to obtain blood samples in order to study their genetics, but no one shared Henrietta's unique traits.


Although she died in 1951, Lacks has posthumously garnered some media attention and recognition including magazine and newspaper articles, books, an episode from a television series, and documentaries.  She was also bestowed with honors for her contributions to science by Morehouse College and the mayor of Atlanta, as well as an annual day of commemoration by the community and residents of Turners Station.  There was also a Congressional resolution presented by Robert Erlich.  
Even in death Henrietta Lacks lives on through the 20 tons of HeLa cells collected and reproduced in the name of science.

 

 

Also Check Out:

The Story Behind Black History Month

Phillis Wheatley - First Published African-American

Charles Hamilton Houston - Civil Rights Attorney

Althea Gibson - Early Black Dominance in Sports

Lt. Colonel Allen Allensworth - Slavery to Service 

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