Stepping out of the shadows of her ex-husbands’ success, Torrei Hart is hell bent on making a new name for herself. She’s much more than just Kevin Hart’s ex-wife, and she wants to make it clear. First and foremost, she’s a mother, but she is also an actress and she’s also passionate, spiritual, driven, straightforward and a mogul in the making.


The name Meesha Mink stands out in urban fiction like no other, simply because it speaks to the uniqueness and creativity of it's owner. After making her debut in 2008 with the well received, Desperate Hoodwives, Mink has continued to release page turning quality both as a co-author and with her individual works. Her latest book to make a mark on readers is Kiss The Ring, a modern day Foxy Brown type story, about a woman on a mission to avenge the death of her son. Released in August, it's the first book of her latest series and a dynamic read for lovers of all genres. We interviewed the author to discuss the series, the state of urban fiction and much more. Check it out here...


Telling anyone's story can be tricky because it can go wrong in a number of ways. From focusing on the wrong details or overlooking something that viewers were looking forward to. When the subject is someone like Jimi Hendrix, who few really knew, it gets that much more difficult. Though he is well regarded as one of the greatest guitarist ever, his career really only spanned 4 years. That gives you a specific time period to focus on, but it also demands that you show why he deserves all the acclaim in huge chunks.


Idris Elba and Taraji P. Henson star in No Good Deed, the tale of what happens when a criminal escapes from prison and finds his way into an unsuspecting woman's home. We've seen this story before but with a full African-American cast, and no Tyler Perry involvement, it feels like a fresh idea and a worthy watch. Plus the stars make for pretty great eye candy, which I think the production team knew would be good for the big screen.


I was first introduced to Jhené Aiko on Kendrick Lamar's "Growing Apart." Her voice is gentle and somewhat tinged with a sultriness that often encroaches on cutting aggression. Aiko understands where to emphasize her voice, wrapping it around the lyrics to achieve a hypnotic mix of hip hop and R&B. Souled Out, the debut from the singer is made up of mid-temp melodies that emerge as freestyles, rather than songs. This is not a bad thing because Aiko has stated that her process of recording music is one of letting it unfold rather than rushing.

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Originality is such a hard thing to come by these days that it’s no wonder you’ll see so many movies, TV shows and music that look and sound the same.
 When is the last time you heard a song or movie that you couldn’t compare to something else prior? Probably never. That doesn’t mean that originality or creativity has died, but just means that people have a brand new way of seeing things. One of the greatest movies of all times, Star Wars is often compared to Star Trek. They have forums of geeks and nerds sighting the familiarities between these two, I’ll save you the time and say that I’ve seen all the Star Wars series and none of the Star Trek franchise despite their many TV shows and spin-off movies but I'm aware of how they tend to overlap each other in some aspects.

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Talk That Talk is seductive and sassy, with a touch of piercing rhythms. It is as if Rihanna is content inhabiting a playground of techno beats, up-tempo Caribbean numbers and grinding synths that clatter, growl and snare, leaving a billowing image that is flirtatious and intoxicating. The opener to Talk That Talk, "You Da One," is embossed in an island melody backed with a dubstep beat provided by Dr. Luke, who has produced chart topping songs for Katy Perry and Pink. "We Found Love," drips with electronic house elements in a relaxed atmosphere. While at times, it feels like a Loud leftover due to the repetitive bubblegum jubilation, it has provided Rihanna yet another #1.
The title track features Jay-Z and a masterfully done beat provided by a sample from Notorious B.I.G. and the Stargate audio essence. Possibly “Umbrella” part deux, the song has Rihanna delivering the written words with ease.  She displays a similar feisty tone on "Cockiness (Love It)" a short rap and dancehall styled banger.  “Birthday Cake,” finds Rihanna using double entendres before cutting to the chase with her intentions.
Both "We All Want Love & "Drunk on Love," embody the same magic that Rihanna adds to her lower grooves. The former reaches hippy-esque qualities to the point where the listener can envision Rihanna dancing in fields of love amidst a clichéd message that somehow manages to work among the scorching perception Talk That Talk echoes. The latter, finds her trying to out sing the music provided.
"Farewell," is a fitting finish to an album that presents a brand new Rihanna. Gone is the morbid and dark exhibition presented on Rated R and the euphoria of Loud. What remains is a mischievous, enticing and sultry pop superstar whose adventures lie in a risqué storybook that uses a proven winning formula.
Prime Cuts:  “You Da One,” “Where Have You Been,” & “Talk That Talk”
Talk That Talk receives a PAR
Rating:
P…Horrible
PA…Tolerable
PAR…Good
PARL…Kinda Great
PARLÉ… Classic
Also Check Out:

Talk That Talk is seductive and sassy, with a touch of piercing rhythms. It is as if Rihanna is content inhabiting a playground of techno beats, up-tempo Caribbean numbers and grinding synths that clatter, growl and snare, leaving a billowing image that is flirtatious and intoxicating. The opener to Talk That Talk, "You Da One," is embossed in an island melody backed with a dubstep beat provided by Dr. Luke, who has produced chart topping songs for Katy Perry and Pink. "We Found Love," drips with electronic house elements in a relaxed atmosphere. While at times, it feels like a Loud leftover due to the repetitive bubblegum jubilation, it has provided Rihanna yet another #1.


The title track features Jay-Z and a masterfully done beat provided by a sample from Notorious B.I.G. and the Stargate audio essence. Possibly “Umbrella” part deux, the song has Rihanna delivering the written words with ease.  She displays a similar feisty tone on "Cockiness (Love It)" a short rap and dancehall styled banger.  “Birthday Cake,” finds Rihanna using double entendres before cutting to the chase with her intentions. 


Both "We All Want Love" & "Drunk on Love," embody the same magic that Rihanna adds to her lower grooves. The former reaches hippy-esque qualities to the point where the listener can envision Rihanna dancing in fields of love amidst a clichéd message that somehow manages to work among the scorching perception Talk That Talk echoes. The latter, finds her trying to out sing the music provided.


"Farewell," is a fitting finish to an album that presents a brand new Rihanna. Gone is the morbid and dark exhibition presented on Rated R and the euphoria of Loud. What remains is a mischievous, enticing and sultry pop superstar whose adventures lie in a risqué storybook that uses a proven winning formula. 

 


Prime Cuts:  “You Da One,” “Where Have You Been,” & “Talk That Talk”

 


Talk That Talk receives a PAR

 


Rating:

P…Horrible

PA…Tolerable

PAR…Good

PARL…Kinda Great

PARLÉ… Classic  

 

 

Also Check Out:

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Ambition... Wale album review

What My Husband Doesn't Know... DVD review

"Braxton Family Values" Returns with NYC Premiere

Eyes On The Throne - Thoughts on Jay & Kanye show

 

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